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Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website.
Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.
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For more information on CDC’s web notification policies, see Website Disclaimers.

State, tribal, territorial, and local jurisdictions: CDC worked with state, tribal, territorial, and local jurisdictions on the development of COVID-19 vaccination plans for their respective areas. CDC released a playbook on September 16, 2020, to provide specific information to consider during vaccination plan development. The playbook is updated periodically to provide jurisdictions with the latest information.
Private partners and federal agencies: CDC has worked with private partners, such as chains and networks of independent pharmacies, and other federal agencies (e.g., the Indian Health Service) on plans for wider distribution of COVID-19 vaccines. For example, CDC is working with pharmacies to offer on-site COVID-19 vaccination services for residents in long-term care settings, such skilled nursing facilities, nursing homes, and assisted living facilities, where most residents are over 65 years of age.

If you plan to travel internationally, get tested before you travel by air into the United States (US), or be prepared to show proof of a recent positive viral test and a letter from your healthcare provider or a public health official stating that you were cleared to travel.
On January 12, 2021, CDC issued an Order requiring all air passengers arriving to the US from a foreign country to get tested no more than 3 days before their flight departs and to present the negative result or documentation of having recovered from COVID-19 to the airline before boarding the flight. This Order will go into effect at 12:01am EST (5:01am GMT) on January 26, 2021.
When it goes into effect, this Order will replace a  previous order currently in effect and signed by the CDC Director on December 25, 2020, requiring a negative pre-departure COVID-19 test result for all airline passengers arriving into the United States from the United Kingdompdf icon.
Frequently Asked Questions
Does this requirement apply to US citizens?
This Order applies to all air passengers, 2 years of age or older, traveling into the US, including US citizens and legal permanent residents.
Are foreign nationals no longer subject to Presidential Proclamation travel restrictions if they can show a negative test or documentation of recovery?
The CDC order does not replace the Presidential proclamations. Therefore, a negative test result for COVID-19 or documentation of having recovered from COVID-19 to the airline before boarding the flight does not exempt a foreign national from the travel restrictions outlined in the Presidential proclamations.
With specific exceptions, several Presidential proclamations suspend and limit entry into the United States, as immigrants or nonimmigrants, all aliens who were physically present within specific countries during the 14-day period preceding their entry or attempted entry into the United States.
For a full list of countries and links to the proclamations on the White House website, visit Travelers Prohibited from Entry to the United States.
Are territories or possessions of the US considered foreign countries for the purposes of this Order?
No, the Order to present a documentation of a negative COVID-19 test or recovery from COVID-19 does not apply to air passengers flying from a US territory or possession to a US state.
US territories and possessions of the US include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands.
When do I need to get a test to travel to the US? And what kind of test do I need?
Get tested no more than 3 days before your flight to the US departs. Make sure to be tested with a viral test (NAAT or antigen test) to determine if you are currently infected with COVID-19. Also make sure that you receive your results before your flight departs and have documentation of your results to show the airline.
What if I recently recovered from COVID-19?
CDC does not recommend getting tested again in the three months after a positive viral test, as long as you do not have symptoms of COVID-19. If you have had a positive viral test in the past 3 months, and you have met the criteria to end isolation, you may travel instead with documentation of your positive viral test results and a letter from your healthcare provider or a public health official that states you have been cleared for travel. The positive test result and letter together are referred to as “documentation of recovery.”
Who is checking to make sure that people have a negative test or documentation of recovery before they board a plane to the US?
The airline will confirm a COVID-19 negative test result or documentation of recovery for all passengers before boarding.
What happens if I don’t take a test and want to travel to the US?
Air passengers traveling to the US are required to present a negative COVID-19 test result or documentation of recovery.  Airlines must confirm the negative test result or documentation of recovery for all passengers before boarding. If a passenger chooses not to present a test result or documentation of recovery, the airline must deny boarding to the passenger.
What happens if I test positive?
People should self-isolate and delay their travel if symptoms develop or a pre-departure test result is positive until they have recovered from COVID-19. Airlines must refuse to board anyone who does not present a negative test result for COVID-19 or documentation of recovery.
What is a verifiable test result?
A verifiable test result must be in the form of written documentation (paper or electronic copy) of a laboratory test result. Testing must be performed using a viral test (NAAT or antigen), and negative results must be presented to the airline prior to boarding. The test result documentation must include information that identifies the person, a specimen collection date and the type of test. A negative test result must show test was done within the 3 days before the flight. A positive test result must show the test was done within the 3 months before the flight.
What kind of documentation of my test result do I need to present?
CDC requires that air passengers arriving in the US have a paper or electronic copy of their test result for review by the airline before you board and for potential review by public health officials after you arrive in the US.
If I tested negative before my flight, do I need to get another test when I get to the US?
CDC recommends that travelers get tested 3-5 days after travel AND stay home or otherwise self-quarantine for 7 days after travel. Even if you test negative, stay home for the full 7 days. If you don’t get tested, it’s safest to stay home for 10 days. Always follow state and local recommendations or requirements related to travel.
All travelers (including those who have recovered from COVID-19) should remember to wear a mask, stay at least 6 feet apart from people who are not in your household, and wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after blowing their nose, coughing, or sneezing and before eating. Travelers should look for symptoms of COVID-19, and take your temperature if you feel sick. Anyone sick with symptoms of COVID-19 should self-isolate and delay further travel.
For more information, visit After You Travel Internationally
Do I need to get a test before leaving the US?
CDC recommends that you get tested with a viral test (NAAT or antigen) 1-3 days before you travel internationally. Travelers should additionally follow any requirements at their destination.
When does this order take effect?
This Order will go into effect on January 26, 2021.
Does this order apply to all flights?  Or just commercial flights?
This order applies to all flights, including private flights and general aviation aircraft (charter flights). Passengers traveling by air into the US are required to have proof of testing regardless of flight type.
Does the testing requirement apply to aircraft crew members?
Crew members on official duty, whether working or in an assigned deadhead status (transportation of a flight crew member as a passenger or non-operating flight crew member), are exempt from the testing requirement as long as they follow industry standard protocols for the prevention of COVID-19 as set forth in relevant Safety Alerts for Operators (SAFOs) issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).
If I have one or more connecting flights to the US, does the 3-day period apply to the first flight or the last one?
If you are arriving on a direct flight to the US, your test must be done within the 3 days before your flight to the US departs. If you are arriving to the US via one or more connecting flights, your test must be done in the 3 days before the first flight in your itinerary, but only if the connecting flights were booked as a single passenger record with a final destination in the US and each connection (layover) is no longer than 24 hours long. If your connecting flight to the US was booked separately or a connection in your itinerary lasts longer than 24 hours, you will need to get tested within the 3 days before your flight that arrives in the US.
What happens if my flight is delayed and it goes over the 3-day limit for testing?
If your flight is delayed before departure, you will need to get re-tested if the delay causes your test to fall outside of the 3-day pre-departure testing period requirement.
If I am connecting through the US to another country, do I still need to get tested?
Yes.  Any flight entering the US, even for a connection, will require testing before departure.
What should airlines and operators of private flights or general aviation aircraft do with passenger attestations?
Operators of private flights and general aviation aircraft must maintain passenger attestations for two years, per the Order.
Do airlines and operators of private flights or general aviation aircraft need to keep copies of passenger test results?
No, passengers must show a copy of their test results to airline employees or the aircraft operator before boarding, but the airline or aircraft operator does not need to retain copies of test results.
What if I have had a COVID-19 vaccine?  Do I still need a negative COVID-19 test or documentation of recovery from COVID-19?
Yes, all air passengers traveling to the US, regardless of vaccination status, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test result or documentation of recovery.

Two syndromic surveillance systems, the U.S. Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (ILINet) and the National Syndromic Surveillance Project (NSSP), are being used to monitor trends in outpatient and emergency department (ED) visits that may be associated with COVID-19 illness. Each system monitors activity in a slightly different set of providers/facilities and uses a slightly different set of symptoms that may be associated with SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. ILINet provides information about visits to outpatient providers or emergency departments for influenza-like illness (ILI: fever plus cough and/or sore throat) and NSSP provides information about visits to EDs for ILI and COVID-like illness (CLI: fever plus cough and/or shortness of breath or difficulty breathing). Some EDs contribute ILI data to both ILINet and NSSP. Both systems are currently being affected by changes in health care seeking behavior, including increased use of telemedicine and increased social distancing. These changes affect the numbers of people seeking care in the outpatient and ED settings. Syndromic data, including CLI and ILI, should be interpreted with caution and should be evaluated in combination with other sources of surveillance data, especially laboratory testing results, to obtain a complete and accurate picture of respiratory illness.
Nationally, the overall percentages of visits to outpatient providers or EDs remained stable (change of ≤0.1%) for ILI and decreased for CLI during week 1 compared with week 53. During week 1, the percentages of ED visits captured in NSSP for CLI and ILI were 7.5% and 1.3%, respectively. In ILINet, 1.7% of visits reported during week 1 were for ILI, which has remained stable (change of ≤0.1%) compared with week 53 and below the national baseline (2.4% for October 2019 through September 2020; 2.6% since October 2020) for the 39th consecutive week. This level of ILI is lower than is typical for ILINet during this time of year.

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The percentages of visits for ILI reported in ILINet in week 1 decreased for two age groups (0–4 years and 50–64 years) compared with week 53. In the remaining age groups (5–24 years, 25–49 years, and 65 years and older), these percentages remained stable (change of ≤0.1%).

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On a regional levelexternal icon, two regions (Region 5 [Midwest]and 9 [South/West Coast]) reported an increase in at least one indicator of mild to moderate illness (CLI and/or ILI) during week 1 compared with week 53. The remaining eight regions reported a stable (change of ≤0.1%) or decreasing level of mild to moderate illness during week 1 compared with week 53; however, three of these regions (Regions 2 (New Jersey/New York/Puerto Rico), 4 (Southeast) and 6 (South Central) have reported an increasing trend in at least one of these indicators during recent weeks. The percentage of visits for ILI to ILINet providers during week 1 was above the the region-specific baseline in one region (Region 9 [South/West Coast]).
ILI Activity Levels
Data collected in ILINet are used to produce a measure of ILI activity for all 50 states, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the District of Columbia, New York City and for each core-based statistical area (CBSA) where at least one provider is located. The mean reported percentage of visits due to ILI for the current week is compared with the mean reported during non-influenza weeks, and the activity levels correspond to the number of standard deviations below, at, or above the mean.
The number of jurisdictions at each activity level during week 53 and the previous week are summarized in the table below.

ILI Activity Levels
Activity Level
Number of Jurisdictions
Number of CBSAs
Week 1 (Week ending  Jan. 9, 2021)
Week 53 (Week ending  Jan. 2, 2021)
Week 1 (Week ending  Jan. 9, 2021)
Week 53 (Week ending  Jan. 2, 2021)
Very High
0
0
2
0
High
0
0
3
4
Moderate
0
0
12
15
Low
5
4
47
50
Minimal
49
50
544
547
Insufficient Data
1
1
321
313

*Note: Data collected in ILINet may disproportionally represent certain populations within a state and may not accurately depict the full picture of respiratory disease activity for the whole state. Differences in the data presented here by CDC and independently by some state health departments likely represent differing levels of data completeness with data presented by the state likely being the more complete.
Additional information about medically attended outpatient and emergency department visits for ILI and CLI: Surveillance Methods

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Annex: Key Activities
Note: This list is meant to demonstrate examples of potential activities for each strategic objective. The list is not necessarily comprehensive, nor does it imply funding support for any specific activity.
1. Strengthen global capacity at country and regional levels to prevent, detect, and respond to COVID-19 cases, including ensuring timely and accurate data to inform public health decision-making and strengthening the public health workforce globally.
Increase capacity to detect, investigate, report, and respond to COVID-19 transmission.
Provide technical support to partner governments through their Ministries of Health, other relevant ministries, international or national organizations and agencies responsible for human health, animal health, and public-health emergency preparedness to reduce the impact of COVID-19 on groups disproportionately affected.
Increase the capacity of national and local level surveillance and laboratory systems, including strengthening existing respiratory disease surveillance platforms, to detect and report priority pathogens.
Support countries’ development and deployment of health information systems to facilitate the timely collection, management, and analysis of critical public health data.
Support training of critical field epidemiologists to analyze and interpret surveillance data and to investigate, track, and contain outbreaks.
Support training of critical laboratorians to ensure timely and accurate laboratory diagnosis and reporting.
Support training and capacity building of data scientists who can analyze and interpret epidemiology and laboratory data to inform decision-making.
Support countries’ timely sharing of surveillance and epidemiologic data across all relevant sectors to rapidly identify and disseminate knowledge and build upon the evidence base for successful intervention.
Strengthen border health security, planning, and surveillance at ports of entry.
Support countries to develop and implement public health laws and regulations necessary—including quarantine, isolation, and mitigation measures—to prevent, detect, and respond to health threats.
Promote international coordination as regulatory frameworks are evaluated to ensure responsiveness to emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

Improve coordination and management of the COVID-19 response through a One Health approach that strengthens preparedness activities across human, animal, and environmental health sectors.
Strengthen animal health surveillance systems, including reporting and linkage to human health programs to prevent unnecessary spillover.
Identify risks associated with zoonotic disease transmission (e.g., occupation, animal ownership, livestock, place of residence near wildlife).
Collaborate with international partners to identify animal species involved in COVID-19 spillover to humans (reservoir host or intermediate host).
Assess virus prevalence in various species of animals (reservoirs(s) and possible intermediate host(s)).
Identify and describe possible transmission modes of COVID-19 between animals and humans.
Develop risk reduction strategies for preventing disease transmission between animals and humans, as well as between different animal species.
Support global animal health partners for the development of animal diagnostic tests, including serological tests for animal population screening.
Support development and use of integrated One Health surveillance systems for reporting and responding to animals infected with SARS-CoV-2 (and with other pathogens).
Support global One Health partners, including: The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), and The World Health Organization (WHO), Tripartite in developing guidance and capacity building on the human-animal-environment aspects of COVID-19 and other zoonotic diseases.
Support training and capacity building in the animal health workforce and strengthen linkages with the human health sector.

2. Prevent and mitigate COVID-19 transmission across borders, in the community, in healthcare facilities, and among healthcare workers, including approaches to minimize disruptions to essential health services.
Mitigate COVID-19 transmission in communities.
Facilitate activities to reduce spread of COVID-19 within communities.
Support contact tracing activities.
Support mitigation activities that address those at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19.
Support risk and media communications, particularly to reach populations with low adherence to mitigation recommendations.
Support water, sanitation, and hygiene activities, targeting groups experiencing limited access to clean water.
Support the development and implementation of appropriate mitigation activities for refugees, displaced persons, and other under-resourced communities.
Evaluate the impact and adherence levels of recommended mitigation measures and share lessons learned across countries.

Support critical needs of healthcare facilities, healthcare workers, and public health personnel and minimize disruptions to essential health services.
Develop and implement approaches to rapidly identify and isolate suspected COVID-19 among patients, healthcare workers, and visitors to reduce healthcare-associated virus spread.
Provide practical laboratory platforms and point-of-care diagnostics to improve the detection and differential diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and other respiratory viruses.
Strengthen infection prevention and control policies and procedures in rural and urban healthcare settings.
Build on existing infection prevention and control to coordinate and accelerate implementation.
Improve situational awareness of critical information in the healthcare system, such as preparedness, supplies, equipment, and capacity.
Facilitate safe and respectful management of human remains.
Support and evaluate clinical mitigation activities to keep health services from being overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients.
Develop operational guidance for maintaining essential health services and public health activities during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Communicate with essential public health service recipients about the safety and importance of continuing to seek and receive health services.
Secure commodities including personal protective equipment (PPE) and laboratory diagnostics to maintain health services and public health programs.
Coordinate closely between essential health services—such as diagnostic and curative services for malaria and neglected tropical diseases, immunization services, HIV/TB programs, and maternal and child health programs, and COVID-19 programs—during activity planning to modify strategies that ensure COVID-19 precautions, implement protocols for protecting health workers, and apply mitigation measures for targeted communities.
Develop infection prevention and control guidance for healthcare providers, including vaccinators and TB service providers, on how to safely undertake patient-centered work in the COVID-19 environment.
Expand differentiated service delivery models to increase access to lifesaving medical countermeasures — such as antiretroviral treatment for people living with HIV or combination antibiotic regimens for people with active TB cases — through multi-month medication dispensing, community-based delivery options, and increasing clinic hours.
Use effective online modules to continue workforce training and expand telehealth services.

3. Contribute to the scientific understanding of COVID-19 and address crucial unknowns regarding clinical severity, modes of transmission, and duration of immunity following infection and/or vaccination, through support of special investigations.
Collaborate with partner countries and organizations to study transmission and conduct modeling to guide prevention and control measures and build research capacity.
Conduct and participate in therapeutic and vaccine clinical trials as appropriate.
Collect and report data to provide critical information on the clinical course and outcomes of COVID-19 and use that information to improve clinical care.
Support countries’ timely sharing of research data.
Evaluate and assess mitigation measures and strengthened surveillance and use evaluations to improve programs and surveillance systems.
Evaluate impact of preventive or protective interventions.
Improve pathogen identification and characterization using next-generation sequencing and other advanced molecular technologies.
Monitor long-term impacts for people infected with SARS-CoV-2.
Collaborate with partner countries and organizations to identify approaches to minimize the impact of COVID-19 on critical public health programs.
Contribute to the scientific understanding of COVID-19 and address crucial unknowns regarding clinical severity, extent and pathways of transmission, and infection with support for special investigations (see the CDC Science Agenda for key priority areas).
4. Strengthen national and global readiness to implement and evaluate vaccination programs and use of therapeutics when available.
Provide technical assistance in the development of protocols for introduction of new vaccines and therapeutics and the development of communication materials to engage policy makers and communities.
Support and strengthen national immunization advisory groups in evidence-based policy making.
Provide support to countries and partners for management and distribution of vaccines, therapeutics, and related supplies.
Provide technical assistance to countries and partners for monitoring and evaluation, including data analysis and evaluation on the safety of vaccines and therapeutics.

Why Strain Surveillance is Important for Public Health
CDC has been conducting SARS-CoV-2 Strain Surveillance to build a collection of SARS-CoV-2 specimens and sequences to support public health response. Routine analysis of the available genetic sequence data will enable CDC and its public health partners to identify variant viruses for further characterization.
Viruses generally acquire mutations over time, giving rise to new variants. For instance, another strain recently emerged in Nigeria[1]. CDC also is monitoring this strain but, at this time, it has shown no characteristics of greater concern to public health experts.
Some of the potential consequences of emerging variants are the following:
Ability to spread more quickly in people. There is already evidence that one mutation, D614G, confers increased ability to spread more quickly than the wild-type[2] SARS-CoV-2. In the lab, 614G variants propagate more quickly in human respiratory epithelial cells, outcompeting 614D viruses. There also is epidemiologic evidence that the 614G variant spreads more quickly than viruses without the mutation.
Ability to cause either milder or more severe disease in people. There is no evidence that these recently identified SARS-CoV-2 variants cause more severe disease than earlier ones.
Ability to evade detection by specific diagnostic tests. Most commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests have multiple targets to detect the virus, such that even if a mutation impacts one of the targets, the other PCR targets will still work.
Decreased susceptibility to therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies.
Ability to evade natural or vaccine-induced immunity. Both vaccination against and natural infection with SARS-CoV-2 produce a “polyclonal” response that targets several parts of the spike protein. The virus would likely need to accumulate multiple mutations in the spike protein to evade immunity induced by vaccines or by natural infection.
Among these possibilities, the last—the ability to evade vaccine-induced immunity—would likely be the most concerning because once a large proportion of the population is vaccinated, there will be immune pressure that could favor and accelerate emergence of such variants by selecting for “escape mutants.” There is no evidence that this is occurring, and most experts believe escape mutants are unlikely to emerge because of the nature of the virus.
[1] Analysis of sequences from the African Centre of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases (ACEGID), Redeemer’s University, Nigeria, identified two SARS-CoV-2 sequences belonging to the B.1.1.207 lineage. These sequences share one non-synonymous mutation in the spike protein (P681H) in common with the B.1.1.7 lineage but does not share any of the other 22 unique mutations of B.1.1.7 lineage. The P681H residue is near the S1/S2 furin cleavage site, a site with high variability in coronaviruses. At this time, it is unknown when this variant may have first emerged. Currently there is no evidence to indicate this variant has any impact on disease severity or is contributing to increased transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Nigeria.
[2] “Wild-type” refers to the strain of virus – or background strain – that contains no major mutations.
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If you travel from the United Kingdom to the United States, make plans to get tested before travel.
On March 14, President Trump issued a Presidential Proclamationexternal icon to suspend the entry of foreign nationals who visited the United Kingdom in the past 14 days. Citizens and lawful permanent residents of the United States, certain family members, and other individuals who meet specified exceptions whoexternal icon have been in the UK in the past 14 days are allowed to enter the United States.
On December 25, 2020, CDC issued an Order pdf icon[PDF – 6 pages] requiring proof of a negative COVID-19 test for all air passengers arriving from the United Kingdom (UK) to the United States (US). This Order will go into effect at 7:01pm EST on December 27, 2020 (12:01am GMT on December 28, 2020).

Frequently Asked Questions
Does this requirement apply to US citizens?
This Order applies to all air passengers, 2 years of age or older, traveling from the UK to the US, including US citizens and legal permanent residents.
Are  foreign nationals no longer subject to the travel restrictions from the UK in the Presidential Proclamation on the Suspension of Entry as Immigrants and Nonimmigrants of Certain Additional Persons Who Pose a Risk of Transmitting Coronavirusexternal icon if they can show a negative test or documentation of recovery?
The CDC order does not replace the Presidential Proclamation. Therefore, providing proof of a negative test result for COVID-19 or documentation of having recovered from COVID-19 to the airline before boarding the flight does not exempt a foreign national from the travel restrictions outlined in the Presidential proclamation.
With specific exceptions, this and other Presidential proclamations suspend and limit entry into the United States, as immigrants or nonimmigrants, all aliens who were physically present within specific countries, including the UK, during the 14-day period preceding their entry or attempted entry into the United States.
For a full list of countries and links to the proclamations on the White House website, visit Travelers Prohibited from Entry to the United States.
When do I need to get a test to travel from the UK to the US? And what kind of test do I need?
Get tested no more than 3 days before your flight to the US from the UK departs. Make sure to be tested with a viral test (NAAT or antigen test) to determine if you are currently infected with COVID-19. Also make sure that you receive your results before your flight departs and have documentation of your results to show the airline.
Does this requirement apply if I have a layover in the UK?
No, this requirement does not apply to people with layovers of less than 24 hours in the UK.
Does this requirement apply if my travel started in the UK, but my flight to the US has a layover in another country/I’m transiting through another country on my way to the US?
If your travel starts in the UK, you are required to test negative for COVID-19 before travelling to the US.
Who is checking to make sure that people have a negative test before they board a plane in the UK?
The airline will confirm a COVID-19 negative test result for all passengers before boarding.
What if I recently recovered from COVID-19?
CDC does not recommend getting tested again in the three months after a positive viral test, as long as you do not have symptoms of COVID-19. If you have had a positive viral test in the past 3 months, and you have met the criteria to end isolation, travel with a copy of your test results and a letter from your doctor or health department that states you have been cleared for travel.
How should airlines handle passengers with documentation of recently recovering from COVID-19?
CDC is exercising its enforcement discretion to relieve airlines of the legal obligation to verify a negative COVID-19 test result or collect an attestation for the subset of travelers traveling with a copy of a positive test result and a letter from their doctors or health departments stating that they have been cleared for travel.
What happens if I don’t take a test and want to travel to the US from the UK?
Air passengers traveling from the UK to the US are required to have a negative COVID-19 test result.  Airlines must confirm the negative test result for all passengers before boarding. If a passenger chooses not to take a test, the airline must deny boarding to the passenger.
What happens if I test positive?
People should self-isolate and delay their travel if symptoms develop or a pre-departure test result is positive. Airlines must refuse to board anyone who does not provide a negative test result for COVID-19.
What is a verifiable test result?
A verifiable test result must be in the form of written documentation (paper or electronic copy) of a laboratory test result. Testing must be performed using a viral test (NAAT or antigen), and negative results must be provided to the airline prior to boarding. The test result documentation must include information that identifies the person, a specimen collection date showing test was done within the 3 days before the flight, the type of test, and a negative result.
Do I need to get another test when I get to the United States?
CDC recommends that travelers get tested 3-5 days after travel AND stay home or otherwise self-quarantine for 7 days after travel. Even if you test negative, stay home for the full 7 days. If you don’t get tested, it’s safest to stay home for 10 days. Always follow state and local recommendations or requirements related to travel.
Remember to wear a mask, stay at least 6 feet apart from people who are not in your household, and wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing and before eating. Look for symptoms of COVID-19, and take your temperature if you feel sick.
For more information, visit After You Travel Internationally | CDC
Do I need to get a test before returning to the UK?
CDC recommends that you get tested with a viral test (NAAT or antigen) 1-3 days before you travel from the US to the UK. Travelers to the UK should additionally follow any requirements of UK authoritiesexternal icon.
Why does this only apply to travel from the UK?
The UK recently discovered a new variant of SARS-CoV-2 pdf icon[PDF – 6 pages]. While it is known and expected that viruses constantly change through mutation leading to the emergence of new variants, preliminary analysis in the UK suggests that the discovered variant may be more transmissible than previously circulating variants, with an estimated potential to increase the transmissibility of the virus by up to 70%.
Why aren’t we banning travel from the UK?
On March 14, 2020, President Trump issued a Presidential Proclamation to suspend the entry of foreign nationals who visited the UK in the past 14 days. This has reduced air travel to the US from the UK by 90%. This additional testing requirement will strengthen protection of the American public to improve their health and safety and ensure responsible international travel.
When does this order take effect?
This Order will go into effect at 7:01pm EST on December 27, 2020 (12:01 AM GMT on December 28, 2020).

Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website.
Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.
You will be subject to the destination website’s privacy policy when you follow the link.
CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on other federal or private website.

For more information on CDC’s web notification policies, see Website Disclaimers.