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No fatalities have been reported so far, police said.May 21, 2022, 12:03 AM• 4 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleMultiple people were injured and “heavy damage” reported after a destructive tornado tore through northern Michigan Friday afternoon, authorities said.Michigan State Police for the Seventh District confirmed that a tornado touched down in Otsego County.”Trees and power lines blocking roadways. Multiple homes and businesses damaged,” the agency said on Twitter. “Avoid the Gaylord area. Emergency crews are responding.”In this image provided by Steven Bischer, damage is shown following an apparent tornado, on May 20, 2022, in Gaylord, Mich.In this image provided by Steven Bischer, damage is shown following an apparent tornado, on May 20, 2022, in Gaylord, Mich.State police said there was “heavy damage” throughout the area and that an unspecified number of people were transported to local hospitals with injuries. There are no confirmed deaths at this time, police said.Residents in Gaylord are asked to shelter in place through 8 a.m. Saturday due to the “ongoing emergency,” state police said.In this image provided by Steven Bischer, damage is shown following an apparent tornado, on May 20, 2022, in Gaylord, Mich.Images from the scene showed leveled buildings, damaged roofs on businesses, downed trees and cars flipped over.”My heart goes out to the families and small businesses impacted by the tornado and severe weather in Gaylord,” Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said on Twitter. “To the entire Gaylord community — Michigan is with you. We will do what it takes to rebuild.”A severe thunderstorm watch had been issued for the region through the evening, with the National Weather Service warning that “an isolated tornado cannot be ruled out in the greater area.”

Authorities say the search by ground and air in the Texas county where a convicted murderer escaped from a prison transport bus and stabbed the driver last week has concluded as the hunt for him expandsByThe Associated PressMay 20, 2022, 9:57 PM• 2 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleCENTERVILLE, Texas — The search by ground and air in the Texas county where a convicted murderer escaped from a prison transport bus and stabbed the driver last week has concluded as the hunt for him expands, authorities said Friday.Gonzalo Lopez, 46, was being transported to a medical appointment on May 12 in a caged area of the bus when he escaped in Leon County, a rural area between Dallas and Houston, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice has said.The department said Friday that the search was entering “a new, expanded phase,” saying some personnel will remain in the county and will conduct strategic searches of areas outside the original secured perimeter.Inspector General Cris Love said anyone found to be helping or harboring Lopez will face not only arrest and prosecution, but he believes is also “putting themselves in danger.”“Lopez has a complete disregard for human life and will do what it takes to avoid capture,” Love said. “We will take this investigation wherever it leads us until Lopez is back in custody.”The department has said Lopez somehow freed himself from his hand and leg restraints, cut through the expanded metal of the cage and crawled out the bottom. He then attacked the driver, who stopped the bus and got into an altercation with Lopez and they both eventually got off the bus.A second officer at the rear of the bus then exited and approached Lopez, who got back on the bus and started driving down the road, the department said.The officers fired at Lopez and disabled the bus by shooting the rear tire, the department said. The bus then traveled a short distance before leaving the roadway, where Lopez got out and ran into the woods.Lopez was sentenced to life in prison after being convicted in 2006 of killing a man along the Texas-Mexico border,At some point during the escape, the Lopez stabbed the driver, whose wounds weren’t life threatening, the department said.A $50,000 reward for information leading to Lopez’s capture is being offered.

A year after they were freed from the horribly abusive home of their parents in Southern California, some of the 13 children said they felt pressure to move to a rundown apartment in a crime-ridden area by the county agency tasked with their careBy AMY TAXIN Associated PressMay 20, 2022, 11:21 PM• 4 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleRIVERSIDE, Calif. — Several adult children among the 13 siblings freed in 2018 from virtual imprisonment in their abusive parents’ Southern California home found themselves a year later feeling pressured by the county’s guardian to move to an apartment in disrepair in a crime-ridden area, court documents showed.Court documents are slowly being released in Riverside County that were previously sealed in the disturbing case that attracted international attention when details emerged showing the parents shackled and starved their children for years.In a 2019 court filing, an attorney for the adult children of David and Louise Turpin wrote that three of the siblings were taken to see the apartment by an employee for the Riverside County Public Guardian’s office and were “fearful to object so they indicated that the apartment was okay with the expectation that other apartments would be viewed.”When they raised concern about the safety of the neighborhood, the agency said the lease was already signed and the only alternative would be to split up the siblings and place them in a board and care facility, according to the filing by attorney Jack Osborn, who represented the seven adult children after they were freed from their parents’ home.The Turpins were arrested more than four years ago after one of their children escaped from their their Perris, California, home and reported they had been shackled to beds, starved and held largely in isolation from the world. All but the 2-year-old were severely underweight and hadn’t bathed for months. Investigators concluded the youngest child was the only one not abused by the couple, who pleaded guilty to torture and abuse in 2019 and have been sentenced to life in prison.The document release comes after ABC reported that Riverside County’s social service system failed in various instances to help the seven adult and six minor children transition to new lives. The county has hired a private law firm to look into the allegations.Messages seeking comment were left for Osborn and the office of the Public Guardian, which is the county agency tasked with assisting adults unable to properly care for themselves or manage their finances. Brooke Federico, a spokeswoman for Riverside County, declined to discuss details of the case said the release of the court documents will assist with the law firm’s review.Not all court documents in the case have been unsealed. It was not immediately known whether the five adult children moved to the apartment described as “in a state of significant disrepair” in Osborn’s filing, and if so, how long they stayed. In his filing, Osborn wrote that the Public Guardian’s office said the apartment was going to be fixed.But the account is similar to comments aired by two of the Turpin children in an interview last year with ABC and by Melissa Donaldson, Riverside County’s director of victim services, who said at times the children did not have a safe place to stay or enough food.The comments were especially surprising because in the days after their release, the adult and minor children were taken to hospitals for treatment and donations and support poured in from around the world.In a separate filing this year, Osborn raised questions about $1.2 million reportedly collected in donations to assist the siblings in the days and weeks after their release and how the one of the siblings who remains under a conservatorship with the Public Guardian can access these charities.That sibling, in 2019, objected to being sent to a board and care facility rather than remaining with her family as they moved to the apartment, Osborn wrote at that time.Her siblings contended that “immediate separation from her brothers and sisters will continue the trauma that she has suffered,” Osborn wrote, particularly since she never complained about the abuse and followed the house rules, which they believe “has resulted in some significant developmental issues.”A few weeks later, the siblings dropped the objection so long as she had frequent contact with them, court papers showed.

NEW YORK — Roger Angell, the celebrated baseball writer and reigning man of letters who during an unfaltering 70-plus years helped define The New Yorker’s urbane wit and style through his essays, humor pieces and editing, has died. He was 101.Angell died Friday of heart failure, according to The New Yorker.”No one lives forever, but you’d be forgiven for thinking that Roger had a good shot at it,” New Yorker Editor David Remnick wrote Friday. “Like the rest of us, he suffered pain and loss and doubt, but he usually kept the blues at bay, always looking forward; he kept writing, reading, memorizing new poems, forming new relationships.”Heir to and upholder of The New Yorker’s earliest days, Angell was the son of founding fiction editor Katharine White and stepson of longtime staff writer E.B. White. He was first published in the magazine in his 20s, during World War II, and was still contributing in his 90s, an improbably trim and youthful man who enjoyed tennis and vodka martinis and regarded his life as “sheltered by privilege and engrossing work, and shot through with good luck.”Angell well lived up to the standards of his famous family. He was a past winner of the BBWAA Career Excellence Award, formerly the J. G. Taylor Spink Award, for meritorious contributions to baseball writing, an honor previously given to Red Smith, Ring Lardner and Damon Runyon among others. He was the first winner of the prize who was not a member of the organization that votes for it, the Baseball Writers’ Association of America.His editing alone was a lifetime achievement. Starting in the 1950s, when he inherited his mother’s job (and office), writers he worked with included John Updike, Ann Beattie, Donald Barthelme and Bobbie Ann Mason, some of whom endured numerous rejections before entering the special club of New Yorker authors. Angell himself acknowledged, unhappily, that even his work didn’t always make the cut.“Unlike his colleagues, he is intensely competitive,” Brendan Gill wrote of Angell in “Here at the New Yorker,” a 1975 memoir. “Any challenge, mental or physical, exhilarates him.”Angell’s New Yorker writings were compiled in several baseball books and in such publications as “The Stone Arbor and Other Stories” and “A Day in the Life of Roger Angell,” a collection of his humor pieces. He also edited “Nothing But You: Love Stories From The New Yorker” and for years wrote an annual Christmas poem for the magazine. At age 93, he completed one of his most highly praised essays, the deeply personal “This Old Man,” winner of a National Magazine Award.“I’ve endured a few knocks but missed worse,” he wrote. “The pains and insults are bearable. My conversation may be full of holes and pauses, but I’ve learned to dispatch a private Apache scout ahead into the next sentence, the one coming up, to see if there are any vacant names or verbs in the landscape up there. If he sends back a warning, I’ll pause meaningfully, duh, until something else comes to mind.”Angell was married three times, most recently to Margaret Moorman. He had three children.Angell was born in New York in 1920 to Katharine and Ernest Angell, an attorney who became head of the American Civil Liberties Union. The New Yorker was founded five years later, with Katharine Angell as fiction editor and a young wit named Andy White (as E.B. White was known to his friends) contributing humor pieces.His parents were gifted and strong, apparently too strong. “What a marriage that must have been,” Roger Angell wrote in “Let Me Finish,” a book of essays published in 2006, “stuffed with sex and brilliance and psychic murder, and imparting a lasting unease.” By 1929, his mother had married the gentler White and Angell would remember weekend visits to the apartment of his mother and her new husband, a place “full of laughing, chain-smoking young writers and artists from The New Yorker.”In high school, he was so absorbed in literature and the literary life that for Christmas one year he asked for a book of A.E Housman’s poems, a top hat and a bottle of sherry. Stationed in Hawaii during World War II, Angell edited an Air Force magazine, and by 1944 had his first byline in The New Yorker. He was identified as Cpl. Roger Angell, author of the brief story “Three Ladies in the Morning,” and his first words to appear in the magazine were “The midtown hotel restaurant was almost empty at 11:30 in the morning,”There were no signs, at least open ones, of family rivalry. White encouraged his stepson to write for the magazine and even recommended him to The New Yorker’s founder, Harold Ross, explaining that Angell “lacks practical experience but he has the goods.” Angell, meanwhile, wrote lovingly of his stepfather. In a 2005 New Yorker essay, he noted that they were close for almost 60 years and recalled that “the sense of home and informal attachment” he got from White’s writings was “even more powerful than it was for his other readers.”Not everyone was charmed by Angell or by the White-Angell family connection at The New Yorker. Former staff writer Renata Adler alleged that Angell “established an overt, superficially jocular state of war with the rest of the magazine.” Grumbling about nepotism was not uncommon, and Tom Wolfe mocked his “cachet” at a magazine where his mother and stepfather were charter members. “It all locks, assured, into place,” Wolfe wrote.Unlike White, known for the children’s classics “Charlotte’s Web” and “Stuart Little,” Angell never wrote a major novel. But he did enjoy a loyal following through his humor writing and his baseball essays, which placed him in the pantheon with both professional sports journalists and with Updike, James Thurber and other moonlighting literary writers. Like Updike, he didn’t alter his prose style for baseball, but demonstrated how well the game was suited for a life of the mind.“Baseball is not life itself, although the resemblance keeps coming up,” Angell wrote in “La Vida,” a 1987 essay. “It’s probably a good idea to keep the two sorted out, but old fans, if they’re anything like me, can’t help noticing how cunningly our game replicates a larger schedule, with its beguiling April optimism; the cheerful roughhouse of June; the grinding, serious, unending (surely) business of midsummer; the September settling of accounts … and then the abrupt running-down of autumn, when we wish for — almost demand — a prolonged and glittering final adventure just before the curtain.”Angell began covering baseball in the early 1960s, when The New Yorker was seeking to expand its readership. Over the following decades, he wrote definitive profiles of players ranging from Hall of Famer Bob Gibson to the fallen Pittsburgh Pirates star Steve Blass and had his say on everything from the verbosity of manager Casey Stengel (“a walking pantheon of evocations”) to the wonders of Derek Jeter (“imperturbably brilliant”). He was born the year before the New York Yankees won their first World Series and his baseball memories spanned from the prime of Babe Ruth to such 21st century stars as Jeter, Mike Trout and Albert Pujols.Even as drugs and labor-management battles shared and even stole headlines, he thought the real story remained on the playing field. Angell never had official credentials as a sportswriter: He was just a fan, a grateful onlooker, a former high school pitcher who once aspired to the big leagues.“At some point in my upper 30s or early 40s, I was seeing a psychiatrist and I came in with a dream,” Angell told The Associated Press in a 1988 interview. “I dreamed that there were some bushes and shrubbery, and there was a gravestone with my name and my birthday on it and the year I was in.“I took this dream to my shrink with some trepidation and he asked how I felt and I said I felt sort of sad. He asked me what the gravestone reminded me of and I said it reminds me of those stones out in center field in Yankee Stadium.“Then I realized it meant the end of my baseball dreams.”———More AP sports: https://apnews.com/hub/sports and https://twitter.com/AP—Sports

A South Carolina judge has granted bond for the former “American Idol” contestant accused of barreling into a man with his pickup truck and killing himByThe Associated PressMay 20, 2022, 9:26 PM• 2 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleSPARTANBURG, S.C. — A South Carolina judge granted bond on Friday to the former “American Idol” contestant accused of barreling into a man with his pickup truck and killing him.Caleb Kennedy, 17, received a $50,000 bond and was ordered to receive mental health treatment while in home detention, news outlets reported.The country music singer had been jailed since February on a charge of driving under the influence resulting in the death of 54-year-old Larry Duane Parris. Police say Kennedy drove his truck up a private driveway in Spartanburg County and struck Larry Duane Parris, 54, pushing Parris into a building.A toxicology report showed that Kennedy had marijuana and Prozac in his system at the time. Kennedy told deputies after the crash that he had taken a “deep draw” from a vaping device and then felt its effects while driving, prosecutors have said.Judges had previously denied bond for Kennedy several times, citing pending toxicology results as well as Kennedy’s mental health.Kennedy advanced into the Top 5 of the television talent show last year, but dropped out of the singing competition after a video circulated of him sitting next to someone wearing what appeared to be a Ku Klux Klan hood. Kennedy apologized at the time for the video, saying “it displayed actions that were not meant to be taken in that way.”Kennedy’s mother, Anita Guy, told news outlets the video was filmed when Kennedy was 12 and had been taken out of context. She said Kennedy had been imitating characters from the film “The Strangers: Prey at Night.”Kennedy’s hometown is listed as Roebuck, just south of Spartanburg.He faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted.

The decision comes as the Biden administration grapples with historic migration.May 20, 2022, 9:18 PM• 3 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleA federal judge in Louisiana on Friday ordered the Biden administration to continue implementing pandemic-related restrictions at the border that effectively close humanitarian relief options for asylum seekers.The restrictions were slated to end on Monday.The restrictions were first implemented under the Trump administration by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention which issued an order that derives its authority from a decades-old public health law known as Title 42.The decision by Judge Robert R. Summerhays, a Trump appointee, comes as the Biden administration’s homeland security apparatus remains strained by a historic level of unauthorized migration in the southwest.Immigration authorities arrested and stopped migrants 234,088 times along the southwest border last month, the highest monthly total in the reams of publicly available Customs and Border Protection data. That number includes a 183% increase in the number of inadmissible migrants trying to get through U.S. land ports since March.Migrants who had crossed the Rio Grande river into the United States are taken away by U.S. Border Patrol agents in Eagle Pass, Texas, on May 20, 2022.During April, DHS says they removed 96,908 migrants under the Title 42 authority and 15,171 migrants under Title 8, which was the primary deportation authority before the pandemic.It’s unclear what impact the use of Title 42 has on overall migration, despite claims from Republicans in Congress that it works as a successful deterrent.Suspected unlawful entries at the border have come at a record pace over the past two years that the Title 42 order has been in effect. Meanwhile, the number of repeat border crossing attempts is up nearly fourfold since the first year the Title 42 was implemented.This is a developing story. Please check for updates.

Another child in the U.S. has died in connection with the mysterious cases of severe hepatitis that have been occurring among children around the country and the globe, officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed on Friday.Investigators learned of the additional death on Thursday, Dr. Jay Butler, deputy director for infectious diseases for the CDC, told reporters during a phone briefing.Officials had previously reported that the deaths of five other children were under investigation in connection to the disease.”Unfortunately, the illness in many of these patients is severe … and the extent of the injury to the liver can be quite extensive. And so, this is clearly a severe disease that we’re taking very carefully for that reason, and the proportion of these, despite treatment, do unfortunately die,” said Dr. Umesh Parashar, chief of the viral gastroenteritis branch at the CDC’s Division of Viral Diseases.As reported earlier this week, the CDC is now investigating at least 180 cases of severe hepatitis with unknown cause among children across 36 states and territories — an increase from the 109 cases that were reported earlier this month. Fifteen of the 180 children who are connected to the investigation in the U.S. have required a transplant, officials said Friday. At this time, there is no epidemiological link between the cases.Technician holding a hepatitis sample with other human medical samples in the background.The “vast majority” of these cases are retrospective, as far back as October 2021, officials said, while only 7% of cases have been over the past two weeks.”I know we’re all eager for information, especially regarding what’s causing these illnesses in young children. We continue to work with clinicians and our state and local public health partners to gather more detailed data, but I want to caution that it does take time to assess the evidence,” Butler explained.”This is an evolving situation and an ongoing investigation, but it’s important to note that severe hepatitis and children remain rare,” Butler said.Investigators continue to work to identify whether the outbreak represents a true increase in the number of severe hepatitis cases in children, or whether an existing pattern has now been uncovered, thanks to improvement in detection of these cases.”While rare, children do sometimes get serious hepatitis, and it’s not uncommon … for the cause to be unknown,” Butler added.The Emergency Operations Center at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is active in Atlanta, March 19. 2021.There is no evidence to suggest, so far, he said, that the word “spike” is appropriate to describe the current emergence of cases.”The question of whether or not this is something that has been ongoing for even longer, and we’re just recognizing that now I think is a very reasonable one. So, I think ultimately, really all we can say for sure at this point in time is we’re not seeing a dramatic increase in the number of cases,” Butler saidThe “leading hypothesis” remains adenovirus, with evidence “accumulating” that it may have a role, though that exact role continues to be investigated. Also, under consideration is whether a prior infection of COVID-19 is playing a role, as well as the impact of mitigation measures, as many children have not been exposed to viruses in recent years due to quarantines, and thus, there may be a “catch-up” factor, Butler added.There are numerous other lines of investigation into whether there could be a further connection with COVID-19, or other co-factors, officials reported.Butler reiterated that any connection to COVID-19 vaccines seems “really unlikely to be playing a direct role,” particularly given that most of these children are too young to receive the vaccine.The CDC continues to encourage parents to be on the lookout for the symptoms of hepatitis, such as vomiting, dark urine, light colored stool and yellowing of the skin, and to contact their child’s pediatrician if they are at all concerned.