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Mexican authorities say gunmen burst into an unregistered drug rehabilitation center in central Mexico and opened fire, killing 24 people and wounding seven

By

The Associated Press

July 2, 2020, 3:43 AM
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MEXICO CITY — Gunmen burst into an unregistered drug rehabilitation center in central Mexico and opened fire Wednesday, killing 24 people and wounding seven, authorities said.
Police in the north-central state of Guanajuato said the attack occurred in the city of Irapuato. Three of the seven wounded were reported in serious condition.

Apparently the attackers shot everyone at the rehab center. State police said nobody was abducted. Photos purporting to show the scene suggest those at the center were lying down when they were sprayed with bullets.
Guanajuato is the scene of a bloody turf battle between the Jalisco cartel and a local gang, and the state has become the most violent in Mexico.
No motive was given in the attack, but Gov. Diego Sinhue Rodríguez Vallejo said drug gangs appeared to have been involved.
“I deeply regret and condemn the events in Irapuato this afternoon,” the governor wrote. “The violence generated by organized crime not only takes the lives of the young, but it takes the peace from families in Guanajuato.”
Mexican drug gangs have killed suspected street-level dealers from rival gangs sheltering at such facilities in the past. It was one of the deadliest attacks on a rehab center since 19 people were killed in 2010 in Chihuahua city in northern Mexico. More than a dozen attacks on such facilities have occurred since then.
Mexico has long had problems with rehab centers because most are privately run, underfunded and often commit abuses against recovering addicts. The government spends relatively little money on rehabilitation, often making the unregistered centers the only option available for poor families.
In addition, addicts and dealers who face attacks from rivals on the streets sometimes take refuge at the rehab clinics, making the clinics themselves targets for attack. Still other gangs have been accused of forcibly recruiting recovering addicts at the centers as dealers, and killing them if they refused.

The massive haul came a month after being outraised by Joe Biden and the DNC.

By

Will Steakin

July 2, 2020, 1:22 AM
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The Donald Trump campaign and Republican National Committee announced on Wednesday they had brought in a whopping, record-breaking $266 million in the second quarter of the 2020 election year, and now have over $295 million in cash on hand.
In June alone, Trump Victory, the joint fundraising committee between the RNC and the Trump campaign, along with other authorized joint fundraising committees, brought in a record $131 million, a significant jump in fundraising for the president’s team after being outraised by presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden and the Democratic National Committee in May.

Trump’s record-breaking $266 million second quarter is over $100 million more than what was raised last quarter, a 71% increase, according to the campaign.
In May, Biden and the DNC brought in $80 million, while Trump and the RNC raised $74 million, marking the first time the president’s reelection effort had been outraised by the former vice president.

U.S. President Donald Trump arrives at a campaign rally at the BOK Center, June 20, 2020 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives at a campaign rally at the BOK Center, June 20, 2020 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.Win Mcnamee/Getty Images

June’s sizable fundraising haul comes at a time of political peril for the president amid sinking polling numbers, trailing Biden nationally by nine points, according to FiveThirtyEight, and facing crises such as an ongoing pandemic and nationwide protests calling for racial justice.
The news also comes weeks after the president’s Tulsa rally — Trump’s first in months — drew lower-than-expected turnout after days of promising that over a million supporters had requested tickets to attend.
In a recent New York Times/Siena poll, Trump trailed Biden by 14 points nationally, with 50% of registered voters saying they would support the former vice president if the election were held today.

“The Trump campaign’s monumental June fundraising haul proves that people are voting with their wallets and that enthusiasm behind President Trump’s re-election is only growing,” Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale said in a statement. “No one is excited about Joe Biden, which is why he has to rely so heavily on surrogates like Barack Obama and radical Hollywood elites. In stark contrast, President Trump is tapping into support from real Americans all across the country who have reaped the benefits of his America First agenda.”
Biden’s June and second quarter numbers have yet to be released.
Trump’s reelection effort has now nearly raised $1 billion, crossing over $947 million raised in the past two years with Wednesday’s second quarter numbers, according to the Trump campaign.

The light at the end of the tunnel got a little dimmer for restaurants in New York City and New Jersey. Restauranteurs were finally prepared to welcome diners back inside after months of being closed and reorganizing venues to work at limited capacity service due to the coronavirus pandemic.”I woke up this morning and it was the first thing I checked — whether or not we were able to open indoor dining,” restaurant owner Emanuele Nigro told ABC News.

Nigro and hundreds of others restaurant owners will have to wait. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Wednesday that New York City restaurants will not be allowed to reopen for indoor dining at reduced capacity as part of phase 3 on July 6 as previously planned.
“Indoors is the problem. The science is showing it more and more. We cannot go ahead at this point in time with indoor dining in New York City,” de Blasio said at a press conference.

His decision came in tandem with an announcement by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who said the next phase would be postponed in New York City until further notice, even as the rest of the state moves forward with plans to reopen.
“It’s going to be postponed until the facts change and it is prudent to open. But the facts have to change because at this point it is imprudent,” Cuomo said during a press conference. “This is a New York City-only modification, because frankly it is a problem that is most pronounced in New York City.”

Cuomo said he was worried about cases going up in other states, but said the decision was made “partially [because of] lack of citizen compliance and lack of local government compliance enforcement.”
A majority of local businesses had planned for weeks how to restructure, had placed food orders, set new menus and hired back staff in advance of the anticipated third phase rollout.

Customers have cocktails outside a restaurant in the Meatpacking District in New York, June 18, 2020.
Customers have cocktails outside a restaurant in the Meatpacking District in New York, June 18, 2020.Richard B. Levine/Newscom

Like so many restaurants in the city, Nigro said his West Village Italian spot Osteria 57 “had staff on standby to work next week, so this was another setback. It’s difficult to run our operation in this way without proper direction in advance.”
Businesses in New York City that got the news just five days before they were set to serve guests at socially distanced tables inside, like Brooklyn Chop House, said, “It’s a complete disaster what they’re doing to restaurant entrepreneurs.”
“This has hurt every restaurant I know. There’s been a tremendous amount of losses in regards to food and staffing. You need seven to 10 days to prepare to reopen a restaurant and now everything we had to get ready for July 6 is down the drain,” Stratis Morfogen, the restaurant’s director of operations, told ABC News. “This isn’t like turning on a light switch. There’s weeks of preparation. Every restaurant has rehired staff and bought food.”

Waiters at a restaurant adjust social distancing screens outside for outdoor seating seating that follows current health guidelines to slow the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19) at a restaurant in New York, June 25, 2020.
Waiters at a restaurant adjust social distancing screens outside for outdoor seating seating that follows current health guidelines to slow the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19) at a restaurant in New York, June 25, 2020.Lucas Jackson/Reuters

The New York City Hospitality Alliance, a nonprofit organization that represents hundreds of restaurants and nightlife venues across the five boroughs, has seen firsthand the financial devastation inflicted by COVID-19 on the hard-hit restaurant industry and said in a press release Wednesday that “the only thing they can afford less than not reopening now, is to reopen, rehire and resupply to only be shut down again.”

Andrew Rigie, the nonprofit’s executive director, told ABC News that after four months of “making financial sacrifices” restaurants’ “survival now depends on compensation reflective of those losses.”
“We respect the government and public health officials’ decision to postpone the anticipated July 6 reopening of indoor dining, but the longer neighborhood restaurants and bars are forced to be closed, the harder it will be for them to ever successfully reopen,” he explained. “This makes it even more urgent to forgive rent, expand outdoor dining and enact other responsive policies to save our city’s beloved small businesses and jobs.”
Longtime New York City and New Jersey restaurateur Leah Cohen has seen the incredible toll COVID-19 has had on the industry, but after losing her own father to the virus in April, she also understands the greater implications.
“I fully support Cuomo and his decision to postpone indoor dining. He has been a true leader in New York and has been data driven not politically driven during our reopening process,” Cohen told ABC News. “He has made smart decisions so far. The last thing we need to do is reopen just to shut back down.”

“While we did prepare the restaurant for the return of indoor dining, we personally were not prepared to open that part of our business at this time,” she said. “Our family has been through a lot and we had to take every precaution, and wait an extended period of time before reopening to ensure everyone’s safety.”
Cohen said that right now she is “thrilled to finally reopen” her vibrant Filipino and Thai restaurant Pig & Khao on the Lower East Side. It will start fulfilling takeout orders next week after being closed since March.
The chef and business owner moved her former New Jersey waterfront bar and restaurant into the heart of midtown Manhattan with the opening of Piggyback, her second New York City restaurant, which welcomed its first guests just weeks before the COVID-19 outbreak shut down the city.

Diners eat al fresco due to COVID-19 concerns in the West Village, June 26, 2020, in New York. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio says he’s delaying the planned resumption of indoor dining at restaurants in the city out of fear it would ignite a spike in coronavirus infections.
Diners eat al fresco due to COVID-19 concerns in the West Village, June 26, 2020, in New York. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio says he’s delaying the planned resumption of indoor dining at restaurants in the city out of fear it would ignite a spike in coronavirus infections.John Minchillo/AP

But much like Morfogen, Cohen understands that other restaurants may now be reeling from the losses that come with the last-minute change of plans.
“I know a lot of my friends in the industry were ready and hopeful that we would be given the green light to move into phase 3 and I feel for them. I truly do,” she said. “Many of them have rehired employees in preparation of Phase 3 only to now turn around and tell people they are out of work again,” Cohen said.

Cohen furthered Rigie’s point and called on city leaders to do more to help hard-hit restaurants with alternatives.
“I would have loved to see the city, in the same press conference postponing indoor dining, announcing expansion plans of outdoor dining areas. We need their support not just their concern,” she said. “We need their help shutting down streets so people aren’t setting up table and chairs with traffic going by. We need their help in working around problems safely.”
The days and weeks ahead for New York City and New Jersey restaurants that have to postpone immediate plans for indoor dining remain uncertain, but restaurant owners like Cohen reiterated the importance of why it needed to be pushed back.
“While it is a scary decision for the hospitality industry as a whole, to postpone indoor dining, it will also be a very personal decision for each restaurant owner as to when and how to restart indoor dining when the time comes,” she said. “None of this is easy or cut and dry. I am terrified for our industry and what’s to come, but having personally seen the toll COVID takes on human life, I am more worried about everyone’s health and safety first and foremost.”

The Oklahoma constitutional amendment was narrowly approved in a majority vote.

By

Alisa Wiersema

July 1, 2020, 11:55 PM
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In just under two weeks, the state of Oklahoma took part in two pandemic-related milestones, the first of which was hosting President Donald Trump’s campaign relaunch in the midst of the COVID-19 crisis.
The second milestone: On Tuesday, Oklahoma become the first state to expand Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act since the onset of the pandemic.

The move was approved by a narrow majority of voters.
The ballot measure, referred to as State Question 802, passed with a slim 50.5% majority vote, and is now expected to expand coverage to more than 200,000 lower-income Oklahomans through a state constitutional amendment. The measure mandates that certain low income adults are able to qualify for health care coverage, and aims to prevent subsequent legislation from making it more difficult for them to obtain health insurance through the Affordable Care Act.

President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the BOK Center, Saturday, June 20, 2020, in Tulsa, Okla.
President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the BOK Center, Saturday, June 20, 2020, in Tulsa, Okla.Sue Ogrocki/AP

Although the initiative began before COVID-19 spread across the country, Tuesday’s decision brought a new level of significance to the Sooner State given its steady increase of reported coronavirus cases over the last several months. As of Wednesday, the Oklahoma State Department of Health reported more than 14,000 cases across the state.
“We protected State Question 802 in the constitution so that we could keep it out of the hands of politicians and special interests — so the language is pretty clear they have to expand Medicaid and the legislature has to fund it,” Amber England, campaign manager of the “Yes on 802 Oklahomans Decide Healthcare” initiative, told reporters during a teleconference Wednesday.
According to England, the passage of the measure would bring more than $1 billion in additional federal funds back to the state and would help “save rural hospitals.”

In a statement issued to ABC News Wednesday, Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt said the passage of State Question 802 tasked state legislators with “the difficult job of deciding where we will find an estimated $200 million in funding to support this constitutional mandate.”
Stitt, who has long opposed the move, said the state is looking at a $1 billion deficit for the upcoming year and said his options going forward include raising taxes or cutting “funding to core services, such as education, roads and bridges or public safety.”

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt gestures as he speaks during a news conference, June 30, 2020, in Oklahoma City.
Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt gestures as he speaks during a news conference, June 30, 2020, in Oklahoma City.Sue Ogrocki/AP

England pushed back on the governor’s assessment, saying that while she’s “certain there will be a robust conversation” regarding the implementation of the amendment, the change will have to happen.
“We have a mandate from a majority of Oklahoma voters that says, ‘We want more health care, not less,'” she said.
According to analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation, similar efforts to expand Medicaid through ballot initiatives have taken place in a handful of other states including Maine, Idaho, Nebraska and Utah over the last few years. Thirty-seven states and the District of Columbia have adopted Medicaid expansion, while 13 states have not, according to the non-profit foundation.

Missouri is currently one of the states that has yet to expand coverage, but the potential for change could be on the horizon following Gov. Mike Parson’s announcement earlier this year that Missourians would vote on the Medicaid expansion question as a part of the state’s August 4 primary election.
The possibility of another red-state shift three months before the November election could further fuel the Trump administration’s rhetoric against the Affordable Care Act. While Trump did not mention his predecessor’s signature policy during his June 20 campaign rally in Tulsa, Tuesday’s vote in Oklahoma served up a political rebuke of the current administration’s attempts to repeal the government-backed health insurance program while the country grapples with a pandemic.

A women is helped by an election worker to put her ballot in a box while voting from her car in the parking lot of Lavell Edwards Stadium on the campus of Brigham Young University, June 30, 2020, in Provo, Utah.
A women is helped by an election worker to put her ballot in a box while voting from her car in the parking lot of Lavell Edwards Stadium on the campus of Brigham Young University, June 30, 2020, in Provo, Utah.George Frey/Getty Images

“It’s very bad health care,” Trump said of the Affordable Care Act in May. “What we want to do is terminate it and give great health care.”
To date, the Trump administration has not offered up an alternative to the to the health care policy. In a June 2019 interview with ABC News, Trump promised to put forth a new plan that he said would “be less expensive than Obamacare by a lot.” At the time, Trump said his administration would have a proposal “in about two months, maybe less” but no plan was ever announced.

Phil Dormitzer, a vaccine developer at Pfizer, speaks about the latest vaccine trial as well as the efficacy and possibility of manufacturing.

MOSCOW — The Kremlin has obtained an overwhelming vote in favor of constitutional changes that will allow Russian President Vladimir Putin to remain in power until 2036, as Russians turned out to back them in a national referendum that concluded today.The result on Wednesday in the weeklong referendum came as little surprise amid a massive campaign by authorities to push people to vote and widespread concerns about pressure on voters and manipulation.

It opens the way for Putin, who has ruled Russia since 1999 — only interrupted between 2008 and 2012 when Dmitry Medvedev was the Russian president — to run again for two more six-year terms after his current one expires in 2024. It potentially means Putin could rule for 16 more years, when he will be in his eighties.

People cast ballots into a mobile ballot box in their apartment as members of an electoral commission wearing protective gear visit local residents on the last day of a week long nationwide vote on constitutional reforms in Moscow, July 1, 2020.
People cast ballots into a mobile ballot box in their apartment as members of an electoral commission wearing protective gear visit local residents on the last day of a week long nationwide vote on constitutional reforms in Moscow, July 1, 2020.Maxim Shemetov/Reuters

Hours even before polls closed, Russia’s Central Elections Commission announced preliminary data showing over 70% of voters had voted in favor of the package of constitutional changes. And by late night in Moscow and with over 95% of the votes counted, the commission said nearly 78% of voters had voted in favor of the constitutional changes and roughly 21% against.
Wednesday was the last day in the vote which has been stretched out across seven days, in what authorities have said is a measure to facilitate social distancing amid Russia’s coronavirus epidemic, which in many parts of the country is worsening.
Russians were asked to vote “yes” or “no” on a package of over 200 amendments which included guarantees to boost pensions as well as changes that will inscribe some conservative values promoted under Putin into the constitution. Those included enshrining the concept of marriage as between a man and a woman, as well as an affirmation of Russians’ belief in “God.”

Members of a local electoral commission empty a ballot box at a polling station after a nationwide vote on constitutional reforms, in Moscow, July 1, 2020.
Members of a local electoral commission empty a ballot box at a polling station after a nationwide vote on constitutional reforms, in Moscow, July 1, 2020.Alexander Nemenov/AFP via Getty Images

Those changes, though, were viewed by many observers as intended to boost turnout for the change that really mattered — an amendment to reset presidential terms after the adoption of the altered constitution. That means that Putin, who is currently in his fourth presidential term, can run for election again, even though the constitution still has a two-term limit.

Critics of the move have denounced it as an illegal “constitutional coup.” On Wednesday evening a few hundred people gathered on Moscow’s central Pushkin Square to protest. Russia’s anti-Kremlin opposition accused authorities of falsifying the result, pointing to exit polls they had conducted themselves in Moscow and St. Petersburg suggesting the amendments had been voted down.
The vote was already largely symbolic, as Russia’s parliament had already passed the amendments into law. But the vote allows for the Kremlin to say the changes have a stamp of public legitimacy.
“Putin is using the public vote to make ordinary people his accomplices in extending his rule and sanctioning the domination of an ultraconservative ideology,” Andrey Kolesnikov, a fellow at the Moscow Carnegie foundation wrote in a column this month.
In a speech on the eve of the referendum, Putin — who voted at a polling station in Moscow on Wednesday — made no mention of its potential to extend his rule. Some analysts believe he has sought the constitutional changes now to prevent himself from becoming a lame duck ahead of 2024 and head off efforts to succeed him.
Putin himself this month said the vote was needed to prevent officials’ “eyes from drifting around hunting for successors.”

Members of a local electoral commission walk with a mobile ballot box in a yard as they visit voters at their homes during a nationwide vote on constitutional reforms in the far eastern city of Vladivostok on July 1, 2020.
Members of a local electoral commission walk with a mobile ballot box in a yard as they visit voters at their homes during a nationwide vote on constitutional reforms in the far eastern city of Vladivostok on July 1, 2020.Pavel Korolyov/AFP via Getty Images

The vote came at a time when Putin’s own popularity suffered an unusual weakening. A poll by Russia’s only independent pollster in May showed Putin’s approval rating had fallen to 59%, its lowest in 20 years. Another poll by Levada in January has shown the number of Russians who “trust” Putin has almost halved in two years.
That slide has been exacerbated by the arrival of the pandemic and its economic fallout, which the government has provided little help against.
And while many Russians still support Putin, his move to remain in power beyond 2024 is highly controversial according to Levada’s polling. Denis Volkov, Levada’s deputy director told ABC News last week that his polling showed Russians were split roughly “50-50” on the issue.
Authorities have employed a sweeping campaign to ensure a high turnout, offering the chance to win prizes, including cash and even apartments to those taking part. Russian celebrities have also been offered payments to make statements supporting the amendments.
There were also widespread reports of public sector workers, including doctors and teachers, being pressured to vote, a common tactic in former Soviet countries.
Authorities have used the coronavirus epidemic to loosen up voting rules. People were allowed to vote from home and at their workplaces and in Moscow and St. Petersburg, online. Many of those measures offer greater opportunities for ballot rigging, election transparency activists have said.
Two journalists this week reported they had voted twice, once online and another time at a polling station. One, Pavel Lobzov, a broadcaster at the liberal station TV Rain, was questioned by police afterwards.
The total turnout for the vote according to the elections commission was over 65%, notably higher than what Levada’s polling and many other political observers had predicted was realistic.
Opposition activists from a campaign against the referendum called “Nyet” or “No,” said their own exit poll in Moscow — where Putin is far less popular than elsewhere — showed 55% of voters had voted against the amendments, versus 45% for.
The opposition had been divided over whether to boycott the vote and many opposed to the changes had said they would stay home. Russia’s leading opposition figure, Alexey Navalny said it was clear the result had been decided in advance.
“We watched a show, with a pre-planned finale,” Navalny said in a video posted on Youtube.

Golos, an NGO that monitors elections said it had recorded over 1,000 violations during the vote. Russia’s elections commission and the Interior ministry said the number of violations were not enough to affect the outcome of the vote.
At polling stations in Moscow this week, some voting “for” told ABC News they support the conservative additions to the constitution and want Putin to remain in power.

Russian President Vladimir Putin shows his passport to a member of a local electoral commission as he arrives to cast his ballot in a nationwide vote on constitutional reforms at a polling station in Moscow on July 1, 2020.
Russian President Vladimir Putin shows his passport to a member of a local electoral commission as he arrives to cast his ballot in a nationwide vote on constitutional reforms at a polling station in Moscow on July 1, 2020.Kremlin Pool Photo/AFP via Getty Images

“Why should we exchange a president for another president? He’ll come and not know [what to do],” Lyudmila Trukacheva, 67, said after voting. “Putin’s sensible, smart. He’s an Orthodox person,” she said.
In gaining the resounding result Putin hopes to affirm his own power among Russia’s elite unsettled by the prospect of his term ending, Tatiana Stanovaya, a non-resident fellow at the Moscow Carnegie foundation wrote in an article published before voting ended on Wednesday.
“Essentially, he is banning his associates from looking around for a successor and from discussing his own future,” she wrote.
“But the pragmatic elites will have a far more sober view of things. They know exactly how voting works in Russia, and that same 70 percent can easily be read as 25 percent real support, or even as a loss of trust entirely,” she wrote.

“We should have a study of those bases and why they were named,” Scott said.

By

Meg Cunningham

July 1, 2020, 7:57 PM
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Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., said that Congress should proceed with legislation that calls for a study into military bases named after figures of the Confederacy, despite the fact that President Donald Trump threatened to veto the bill if such language was present.
On ABC News’ ‘Powerhouse Politics’ podcast, Scott told ABC News Chief White House Correspondent Jonathan Karl and Political Director Rick Klein that renaming bases or monuments should come after a study into their names.

“The willingness for the DOD to study the names of the bases, I think, makes sense to me. How we come to the conclusion on the bases that should be renamed, if at all, is a part of that process that we should study,” Scott said.
“I think that we should move forward with the language basically as it is, from my understanding, which is that we should have a study of those bases and why they were named, and then come to a decision on what we should do about that. I think it’s premature to make a decision before you see the results of that study, something that I’m interested in seeing.”
An amendment to the Department of Defense’s annual spending bill was introduced by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and passed by the Republican-led Senate Arms Services Committee, which would remove names, symbols and displays that commemorate the Confederacy within three years.

President Donald Trump gestures towards reporters at the United Nations General Assembly in New York City, Sept. 25, 2019.
President Donald Trump gestures towards reporters at the United Nations General Assembly in New York City, Sept. 25, 2019.Jonathan Ernst/Reuters, FILE

Scott is at the helm of police reform bills in the Senate Republican caucus, after speaking openly about his experience as a Black man being stopped by law enforcement. The Senate and House are currently at a standstill on reform legislation negotiations, with no clear path forward on how the they will proceed.

“I think you told me on ‘This Week’ that there is basically 70% of agreement between your bill and the Democratic bill in the House,” Karl said. “What next? Is there anything more you can do? Are there bits and pieces that can be taken out of your bill, that you can reach out to, to your Democratic colleagues and get passed or are we just gonna have to wait till after the election on this?”
Scott said the worst outcome for his legislation is to wait until after the November general election to pick it back up.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi holds a news conference on the steps of the Capitol Building, June 30, 2020 in Washington.
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi holds a news conference on the steps of the Capitol Building, June 30, 2020 in Washington.Leah Millis/Reuters

“I think the worst outcome is to wait till after the election on the legislation that I sponsored,” he said. “There are working groups on both sides of the aisle. So there is a reason for us to keep our shoulder to the grindstone for the next few weeks and see if we can emerge from this time back in our states with a compromised bill that leads to the President’s signature.”
“If we miss this opportunity, it won’t be for the lack of effort on my part, and it won’t be because every member of the United States Senate Republicans are willing to move forward and give democrats enough amendments to vote on every single difference they saw in the bill,” he added.
Klein asked Scott about the recent slogan campaigns, such as Black Lives Matter, and if he agreed with the president that those are hateful slogans.
Scott said he doesn’t find the words ‘black lives matter’ hateful themselves, but calls to defund the police, he said, do contribute to stereotyping — something which he has experienced as a Black man.
“I’m not here to defend and or comment on what he does or doesn’t say. I think that’s a path forward that is fraught with problems because I don’t work for the president, I work for the American people,” Scott said.
“I do not find black lives matter, the words themselves as a problem or hateful themselves. I think the concept of defunding the police is a position of stereotyping all law enforcement officers in the same way that I as an African American would hate to be stereotyped because I have been stereotyped,” he added.

Scott’s newly-minted role as the leader of major bipartisan legislation has thrust him into the limelight — and stirred conversation about the possibility of a presidential bid come 2024.
“So, I can’t predict the future. What I can tell you is I think that it’s easier to have a healthy reputation and a higher approval rating as a member of the clergy, then it is as a member of politics so my future is unknown to me, but I don’t have any designs today on running for president of the United States,” he said.
“And frankly, hate that I have received and the death threats and all of the things that have come up — because I’ve worked on a bipartisan piece of legislation to make it safer in neighborhoods — doesn’t make me want to roll back my commitment on term limits in public office and especially in the United States Senate. So, I am thankful to be where I am,” he added.
Also on the podcast, veteran pollster and political consultant Frank Luntz warned that the language Trump is using — referencing “law and order,” and calling himself a “warrior” — is “over-caffeinated” and “not helping him.”
“It’s not that they’re turning against him for what he’s doing. They’re turning against him because of what he’s saying,” Luntz told Karl and Klein.

David Anthony Ware is charged with first-degree murder and other charges.

By

Christina Carrega

July 1, 2020, 3:54 PM
5 min read

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A veteran Tulsa, Oklahoma, police officer died Tuesday after a traffic stop went wrong.
Six weeks after Officer Aurash Zarkeshan completed training with the Tulsa Police Department, he made a regular traffic stop on East 21st Street early Monday morning, police said.

After Zarkeshan ran David Anthony Ware’s information into the system, he called for backup.

Sargent Craig Johnson arrived at the scene.

Tulsa Police Sergeant Craig Johnson died after he was shot on June 29, 2020 by a suspect during a traffic stop.
Tulsa Police Sergeant Craig Johnson died after he was shot on June 29, 2020 by a suspect during a traffic stop.Tulsa Police Department

Ware refused to comply with officers’ commands to step out of his car, said Tulsa Police Chief Wendell Franklin at a press conference on Monday.
Johnson displayed a stun gun and asked Ware to get out of the car 12 times before firing. Franklin said the stun gun was not effective and Zarkeshan also pepper-sprayed Ware.
A struggle ensued and Ware pulled out a gun and fired “several shots at close range,” striking both officers in the head, said Franklin.

Tulsa Police Aurash Zarkeshan is in critical condition after he was shot in the head on June 29, 2020 during a traffic stop.
Tulsa Police Aurash Zarkeshan is in critical condition after he was shot in the head on June 29, 2020 during a traffic stop.Tulsa Police Department

“The driver slowly walked away from the vehicle and went to another car that was waiting for him,” Franklin said.
Both officers were taken to the hospital in critical condition.
Johnson, a 15-year veteran, died on Tuesday afternoon. He leaves behind a wife and two young sons.

His family was presented with a Purple Heart for his service in the line of duty.
Ware, 33, and his accomplice 29-year-old Matthew Hall were arrested.

David Ware was arrested for allegedly shooting two Tulsa police officers during a traffic stop.
David Ware was arrested for allegedly shooting two Tulsa police officers during a traffic stop.Tulsa Police Department

Prosecutors added first-degree murder to Ware’s case on Tuesday in addition to two counts of shooting with intent to kill and criminal possession of a weapon charges. Hall faces accomplice to murder and accomplice to felony charges.

Matthew Hall is charged with being an accomplice to the death of Tulsa Police Sgt. Craig Johnson.
Matthew Hall is charged with being an accomplice to the death of Tulsa Police Sgt. Craig Johnson.Tulsa County jail

Ware is expected to appear before a judge on Thursday and Hall is expected in court on September 2, according to online records.
They are both being held without bond in Tulsa County jail, according to online records.

Researchers say coverings and social distancing help prevent spread.

By

Ivan Pereira
,

Eva Pilgrim
and

Nick Coulson

July 1, 2020, 4:18 PM
5 min read

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Face coverings for COVID-19 protection come in all shapes, sizes, materials and colors.
From bandanas and DIY masks made from handkerchiefs to custom-made cotton masks with your favorite sports team emboldened on the front, health experts say those coverings are crucial for preventing the spread of coronavirus.

But not all face coverings are created equal, according to research from Florida Atlantic University.

Scientists put four common variations of face coverings — a bandana, a handkerchief mask, an over-the-counter cone style mask and a two-layer quilting cotton mask — under tests to see which ones blocked droplets. The quilting cotton masks turned out to be the covering that blocked the most droplets, according to the study.

Florida Atlantic University researchers tested which masks were most effective.
Florida Atlantic University researchers tested which masks were most effective.Florida Atlantic University

“We are basically looking at two main characteristics for the masks. The first was the type of fabric that we used and the second was the construction of the mask,” Sid Verma, an assistant professor at Florida Atlantic University who was part of the study, told “Good Morning America.”
Researchers used a mannequin that simulated coughs and sneezes by spraying particles into the air from its mouth. The scientists said particles traveled eight feet from the mannequin’s mouth when it had no face covering.
When the mannequin’s face was covered by a bandana, droplets traveled more than three feet, according to the study. The handkerchief covering made droplets travel more than a foot away from the mannequin’s mouth while the cone-shaped mask allowed particles to travel eight inches away from the mouth, researchers said.

The quilting cotton mask allowed droplets to travel two-and-a-half inches from the mannequin’s mouth, the study said.

Florida Atlantic University researchers tested which masks were most effective.
Florida Atlantic University researchers tested which masks were most effective.Florida Atlantic University

“Even the bandana fabric will be able to stop the largest droplet sizes,” Verma said. “So if you use a better fabric, it will be more effective.”
Several cities across the country have mandated facial coverings for anyone traveling outside of their household as the number of coronavirus cases has risen in several parts of the country.

People wearing masks ride a scooter in Central Park on May 16, 2020 in New York City, amid the coronavirus pandemic.
People wearing masks ride a scooter in Central Park on May 16, 2020 in New York City, amid the coronavirus pandemic.Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Verma warned that people should also adhere to social distancing in addition to face coverings to protect themselves thoroughly from the virus.
What to know about Coronavirus:

The U.S. Army has quarantined 90 soldiers and instructors who tested positive for the coronavirus during a survival course at Fort Bragg

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The Associated Press

July 1, 2020, 3:53 PM
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FORT BRAGG, N.C. — The U.S. Army has quarantined 90 soldiers and instructors who tested positive for the coronavirus during a survival course at Fort Bragg.
A total of 110 people participated in the course, which was cut short after a single soldier tested positive. Subsequent tests then showed that 82 students and 8 instructors had COVID-19, Army spokeswoman Janice Burton told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

Now all 110 are quarantined, although the 20 people who did not test positive were separated from the rest, she said.
Their course, called Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape, is naturally isolated from Fort Bragg’s other special warfare courses, the Army said.
Guidelines were implemented at Fort Bragg to prevent the spread of coronavirus, and some classes were shifted online. Portions of classes that could not be taught online were closely monitored. Students taking the survival course were tested prior to training and received daily welfare checks.
“The health and wellness of our students and staff is our top priority,” said Maj. Gen. Patrick Roberson. “We will do everything we can to protect our students and their families.”