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Author: COVID-19 NEWS

Visiting a restaurant or barThe COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful and isolating for many people. Many go to restaurants and bars to enjoy a meal without having to cook, to connect with friends and family, and to support businesses that are an important part of many communities.However, visiting bars and restaurants can increase your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19.
Why Visiting Restaurants and Bars May Increase Risk
In a recent study, scientists found that adults with positive COVID-19 test results were twice as likely to have reported dining at a restaurant than those with negative COVID-19 test results.1 There are many factors that may explain why going to restaurants and bars increases your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19:
Wear masks when less than 6 feet apart from other people or indoors

People from different households are gathering in the same space.
Eating and drinking requires the removal of a mask.
If eating indoors, ventilation flow in restaurants and bars can cause droplets to spread at distances greater than 6 feet.2 Poor ventilation can also increase risk as it may cause the virus to accumulate in the air.
Physical distancing of at least 6 feet is often difficult to maintain in restaurants and bars.
People need to talk louder in restaurants and bars to hear one another. This can contribute to the production of more virus aerosols.
Use of alcohol may alter judgment and make it more difficult for people to practice COVID-19 safety measures.
While the safest way to enjoy and support restaurants and bars is to take out food and eat it at home with people who live with you, there are ways that you can go to a restaurant and bar and still reduce your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19.
Check the restaurant’s or bar’s COVID-19 prevention practices before you go
Check if outdoor seating is available and if options allow groups to be at least 6 feet apart from one another. If a tent is set-up outdoors, make sure that at least one side is open or rolled up. An enclosed tent is like eating indoors.
Avoid busy times of day or night. It’s safest to visit when fewer people are at the restaurant or bar.
Check the restaurant or bar’s website and social media to see if you feel comfortable with their COVID-19 safety guidelines. Guidelines should require both staff and patrons to wear masks while not eating or drinking. Check if menus are available online or via app for safer ordering. Call if the posted information is unclear or if you have questions.
Find out if valet parking is required or if you can self-park. If valet is the only option, it’s best to leave your windows open and let your car air out for at least 15 minutes after the valet returns your car to you.
Take steps to protect yourself at the restaurant or bar
Eat outdoors, if possible. You are less likely to get or spread COVID-19 during outdoor activities. Look for seating options that are outside and have proper ventilation of outdoor air, such as tents that have open doors or rolled up sides.
Wear masks at all times, both indoors and outdoors, except when you are actively eating or drinking. Masks help protect both you and those around you.
Avoid crowds and sit at tables spaced at least 6 feet apart from people you don’t live with, both indoors and outdoors. If you are standing, stay at least 6 feet apart from those who do not live with you.
Limit alcohol consumption. Consuming alcohol may make you less likely to follow COVID-19 safety measures.
Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before eating and when exiting the restaurant or bar. If soap and water are not readily available, use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
Ask for individual condiment and salt and pepper packets, as the condiments on the table may not be cleaned between patrons.
Minimize the time you spend in the restaurant or bar. The longer you stay, the more you increase your risk
1 Fisher KA, Tenforde MW, Feldstein LR, et al. Community and Close Contact Exposures Associated with COVID-19 Among Symptomatic Adults ≥18 Years in 11 Outpatient Health Care Facilities — United States, July 2020. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2020;69:1258–1264. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6936a5external icon.
2 Kwon K-S, Park J-I, Park YJ, et al. Evidence of Long-Distance Droplet Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 by Direct Air Flow in a Restaurant in Korea. J Korean Med Sci 2020;35(46):e415. https://doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e415external icon.

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When to seek emergency medical attentionLook for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:
Trouble breathing
Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
New confusion
Inability to wake or stay awake
Pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nail beds, depending on skin tone

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.
Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website.
Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.
You will be subject to the destination website’s privacy policy when you follow the link.
CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on other federal or private website.

For more information on CDC’s web notification policies, see Website Disclaimers.

COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Data DefinitionsTotal Doses Delivered; Total CountThe total number of vaccine doses that have been delivered. Doses delivered include those that the:jurisdiction (state, territory, tribe, or local entity) partner clinics,
retail pharmacies,
long-term care facilities,
dialysis centers participating in the Federal Dialysis Center Program,
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) partner sites,
Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) partner sites, and federal entity facilities (e.g., Department of Defense, Veterans Health Administration, Indian Health Service, and Bureau of Prisons) in that jurisdiction.
Data for each federal entity are also reflected at the national level in the agency callout boxes on the map; combining these data with jurisdiction-level doses delivered data will result in double counting.
For states, Washington DC, the US Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico, total counts of COVID-19 vaccine doses include doses delivered since December 14, 2020.
For the Republic of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, total counts of COVID-19 vaccine doses include doses marked as shipped in VTrckS since December 13, 2020.
Doses Delivered; Rate per 100,000The total number of vaccine doses delivered for every 100,000 people (overall, per the population aged 18 years and older and per the population aged 65 years and older). This allows comparison between areas with different population sizes.
Total Doses Administered; Total CountThe total number of vaccine doses that have been given to people in the United States since December 14, 2020, the date when the first dose was administered to a person in the United States under the Emergency Use Authorization as a non-clinical trial. Doses administered in a jurisdiction (state, territory, tribe, or local entity) include those administered in:
jurisdictional (state, territory, tribe, or local entity) partner clinics,
retail pharmacies,
long-term care facilities,
dialysis centers participating in the Federal Dialysis Center Program,
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) partner sites,
Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) partner sites, and
federal entity facilities (e.g., Department of Defense, Veterans Health Administration, Indian Health Service, and Bureau of Prisons) in that jurisdiction.
Data for each federal entity are also reflected at the national level in the agency callout boxes on the map; combining these data with jurisdiction-level doses administered data will result in double counting. For this measure, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker attributes each dose to the jurisdiction in which the person received the dose.
Total Doses Administered; Rate per 100,000
The total number of vaccine doses given for every 100,000 people (overall, per the population aged 18 years and older and per the population aged 65 years and older). This allows comparison between areas with different population sizes.
People Receiving at Least One Dose (Formerly “Receiving 1 or More Doses”); Total Count*
Represents the total number of people who received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, including those who received one dose of the single-shot Johnson and Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.
This metric includes everyone who has received only one dose and those who received more than one dose.
For this measure, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker attributes each dose to the jurisdiction (state, territory, tribe, or local entity) in which the person resides.
People Receiving at Least One Dose; Percent (%) of the Population*
Represents the percent of people who received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, including those who received one dose of the single-shot Johnson and Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. This metric includes everyone who has received only one dose and those who received more than one dose.
For this measure, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker attributes each dose to the jurisdiction (state, territory, tribe, or local entity) in which the person resides. This includes doses administered by FEMA partner sites, HRSA partner sites, and federal entity facilities.
Estimates for the total population, population of those aged 18 years and older, and population of those aged 65 years and older are used as the denominators to calculate percentages.
People Who Are Fully Vaccinated (Formerly “Receiving 2 Doses”); Total Count*
Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot Johnson and Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.
For this measure, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker attributes each dose to the jurisdiction (state, territory, tribe, or local entity) in which the person resides.
Estimates for the total population, population of those aged 18 years and older, and population of those aged 65 years and older are used as the denominators to calculate percentages.
People Who are Fully Vaccinated; Percent (%) of the Population*
Represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot Johnson and Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.
For this measure, CDC’s COVID Data Tracker attributes each dose to the jurisdiction (state, territory, tribe, or local entity) in which the person resides. This includes doses administered by FEMA partner sites, HRSA partner sites, and federal entity facilities.
Estimates for the total population, population of those aged 18 years and older, and population of those aged 65 years and older are used as the denominators to calculate percentages.
This definition differs from the current CDC Interim Clinical Considerations in two ways:
 According to the interim guidance, the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines should be administered as close to the recommended interval as possible, but not earlier than recommended (i.e., 3 weeks [Pfizer-BioNTech] or 1 month [Moderna]). However, second doses administered within a grace period of 4 days earlier than the recommended date for the second dose are still considered valid. If it is not feasible to adhere to the recommended interval and a delay in vaccination is unavoidable, the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines may be administered up to 6 weeks (42 days) after the first dose. Currently, only limited data are available on efficacy of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines administered beyond this window.
To ensure adequate time for an immune response to occur, a person is considered fully vaccinated greater than or equal to 2 weeks after completion of a two-dose mRNA series or single dose of Janssen vaccine.

Rates per 100,000
Represent the rate of total doses delivered, the rate of total doses administered, the rate of people receiving at least one dose, and the rate of people who are fully vaccinated per 100,000. The total population, population of those aged 18 years and older, and population of those aged 65 years and older are used as estimates to calculate rates for total doses delivered and total doses administered. In some limited circumstances, people might receive vaccinations outside the jurisdiction (state, territory, tribe, or local entity) where they live. These rates currently account for vaccinations that occur in the jurisdiction where the vaccination was administered.
Rates per 100,000 and Percent of the Population Metrics
Measures of vaccination are calculated among the entire population (i.e., all ages), the population who are aged 18 years and older, and the population who are aged 65 years and older.
Percent of the Population
Represents the percent of people receiving at least one dose and the percent of people who are fully vaccinated. The total population, population of those aged 18 years and older, and population of those aged 65 years and older are used as denominators to calculate the percent of the total population, the percent of the population aged 18 years and older, and the percent of the population aged 65 years and older who have received at least 1 dose or who are fully vaccinated. The percent of the total population was derived using the location of residence.
CDC has capped the percent of population coverage metrics at 99.9%. These metrics could be greater than 99.9% for multiple reasons, including census denominator data not including all individuals that currently reside in the jurisdiction (e.g., part time residents) or potential data reporting errors.
TexasTexas provides aggregate dose count data to CDC; therefore, we do not receive specific information at the individual level. This limits our ability to directly calculate certain age-based metrics. Residents of Texas who receive a vaccination in a different state or territory are not attributed to Texas in their population-based metrics but are still included in national-level metrics. As of February 24, 2021, to calculate age-based metrics, CDC assumes:
All people receiving vaccinations in Texas are considered residents of Texas,
The percentage of total doses that were administered to people aged 18 years and older is the same as both (effective February 24, 2021) the percentage of people who received at least one dose and the percentage of fully vaccinated people who are aged 18 years and older. CDC estimates the one-dose metrics for the adult population (18 years and older) of Texas by multiplying the count for the total population receiving at least one dose in Texas by the percentage of total doses administered to adults in Texas. CDC estimated the ”fully vaccinated” metrics for the adult population (18 years and older) of Texas by multiplying the total population who are fully vaccinated in Texas by the percentage of total doses administered to adults in Texas.
The percentage of total doses that were administered to people aged 65 years and older is the same as both (effective March 12, 2021) the percentage of people who received at least one dose and the percentage of fully vaccinated people who are aged 65 years and older. CDC estimates the “at least one dose” metric for the older population (65 years and older) of Texas by first obtaining the percentage of the 65+ population who have received ‘at least one dose’ from the state of Texas’ “COVID-19 Vaccination in Texas”external icon dashboard (percentages used are updated every Thursday). CDC then multiplies this percentage by the count for the total population receiving at least one dose in Texas. CDC repeats the same calculations to estimate the “fully vaccinated” metrics for the older population (65 years and older) of Texas. These values will also be included in the topline national totals for 65+.
Residents of Texas: Residents of Texas who receive a vaccination in a different state or territory are not attributed to Texas in their population-based metrics but are still included in national-level metrics.
*CDC determined the number of people receiving at least one dose and the number of people who are fully vaccinated based on information that state, territorial, tribal, and local public health agencies and federal entities reported to CDC on dose number, dose manufacturer, administration date, recipient ID, and date of submission. Because the method used to determine dose numbers needs to be applied across multiple jurisdictions (states, territories, tribes, or local entities) with different reporting practices, CDC’s dose number estimates might differ from those reported by jurisdictions and federal entities. People receiving doses are attributed to the jurisdiction in which the person resides. When the vaccine manufacturer is not reported, the recipient is considered fully vaccinated with two doses.

Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website.
Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.
You will be subject to the destination website’s privacy policy when you follow the link.
CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on other federal or private website.

For more information on CDC’s web notification policies, see Website Disclaimers.

Text VersionA chart showing 10 illustrations of people where 8 of the 10 are in a dark color and 2 of the people are in a light color to explain that 8 out of 10 deaths from COVID-19 are among people age 65 and over. CDC has information for older adults at higher risk. 8 out 10 COVID-19 deaths reported in the U.S. have been in adults 65 years old and older. Under this sentence: Compared to younger adults, older adults are more likely to require hospitalization if they get COVID-19 please add the following link Link title: Text Version URL: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/investigations-discovery/hospitalization-death-by-age.html
The risk for severe illness with COVID-19 increases with age, with older adults at highest risk.
For example, people in their 50s are at higher risk for severe illness than people in their 40s. Similarly, people in their 60s or 70s are, in general, at higher risk for severe illness than people in their 50s. The greatest risk for severe illness from COVID-19 is among those aged 85 or older.Severe illness means that a person with COVID-19 may require:
hospitalization,
intensive care, or a
ventilator to help them breathe, or
they may even die.
Age Increases Risk for Hospitalization
Older adults are at greater risk of requiring hospitalization or dying if they are diagnosed with COVID-19. As you get older, your risk of being hospitalized for COVID-19 increases.

A chart showing 10 illustrations of people where 8 of the 10 are in a dark color and 2 of the people are in a light color to explain that 8 out of 10 deaths from COVID-19 are among people age 65 and over. CDC has information for older adults at higher risk. 8 out 10 COVID-19 deaths reported in the U.S. have been in adults 65 years old and older.

Compared to younger adults, older adults are more likely to require hospitalization if they get COVID-19
Text Version

Certain Medical Conditions Can Increase Risk
Other factors can also increase your risk for severe illness, such as having certain underlying medical conditions. By understanding the factors that put you at an increased risk, you can make decisions about what kind of precautions to take in your daily life.
If you have an underlying medical condition, you should continue to follow your treatment plan:
Continue your medicines and do not change your treatment plan without talking to your healthcare provider.
Have at least a 30-day supply of prescription and non-prescription medicines. Talk to a healthcare provider, insurer, and pharmacist about getting an extra supply (i.e., more than 30 days) of prescription medicines, if possible, to reduce your trips to the pharmacy.
Do not delay getting emergency medical care because of COVID-19. Emergency departments have contingency infection prevention plans to protect you from getting COVID-19 if you need care.
Call your healthcare provider if you have any concerns about your underlying medical conditions or if you get sick and think that you may have COVID-19. If you need emergency help, call 911 right away.
If you don’t have a healthcare provider, contact your nearest community health centerexternal icon or health department.
Reduce Your Risk of Getting Sick
Everyone, especially older adults and others at increased risk of severe illness, should take steps to protect themselves from getting COVID-19.
Steps to Reduce Your Risk
It is especially important for people at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and those who live or visit with them, to protect themselves from getting COVID-19.
The best way to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 is to:
Wear a mask, when you interact with others.
Limit your in-person interactions with other people as much as possible, particularly when indoors.
Keep space between yourself and others (stay 6 feet away, which is about 2 arm lengths).
Wash your hands often. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or the inside of your elbow. Then wash your hands.
Clean and disinfect surfaces and things you touch often.
Learn additional information for adults with disabilities.
How to Protect Yourself
If you start feeling sick and think you may have COVID-19, get in touch with your healthcare provider within 24 hours.

Before You Go Out or Visit Family & Friends
Consider the level of risk before deciding to go out and ensure that people at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and those who live with them, are taking steps to protect themselves.
There is no way to ensure you have zero risk of getting the virus that causes COVID-19.  So, it is important to understand the risks and know how to reduce your risk as much as possible if or when you do resume some activities, run errands, and attend events and gatherings.

Consider the Level of Risk
In general, the more people you interact with, the more closely you interact with them, and the longer that interaction, the higher your risk of getting and spreading the virus that causes COVID-19.

Before you go out, consider the following:

How many people will you interact with?
Can you keep 6 feet of space between you and others?
Will you be outdoors or indoors?
What’s the length of time that you will be interacting with people?
How likely is it that people will be wearing a mask?

Consider avoiding activities where taking protective measures may be difficult, such as activities where social distancing can’t be maintained.

Take Steps to Protect Yourself

Everyone should take steps to prevent getting and spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to protect themselves, their communities, and people who are at increased risk of severe illness.
If you decide to engage in public activities:

Protect yourself by practicing everyday preventive actions.
Plan shopping trips when stores are typically less crowded in early morning or late in the evenings. Older adults can use “senior hours” when shopping.
Use alternatives to on-site dining such as delivery, take-out, and curb-side pick-up.
Keep these items on hand and use them when venturing out: a mask, tissues, and a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
Avoid others who are not wearing masks.
Wear masks

Masks prevent people from getting and spreading the virus, especially those who may not know they have it.

Masks should be worn over the nose and mouth. Masks are especially important when it is difficult to stay at least 6 feet apart from others or when people are indoors to help protect each other.
Masks offer some protection to you and are also meant to protect those around you, in case you are unknowingly infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.
CDC recognizes that wearing masks may not be possible in every situation or for some people. Some older adults with cognitive, sensory, or behavioral issues might find wearing a mask difficult. Adaptations and alternatives should be considered whenever possible to increase the feasibility of wearing a mask or to reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19 if it is not possible to wear one. These adults need to take extra precautions when interacting with others. Additionally, some older adults may rely on reading lips or facial expressions during social interactions. This can be difficult when others are wearing masks that cover large portions of their face.
Encourage social distancing during your visit

Consider activities where social distancing can be maintained, like socially distanced walks in the neighborhood or facility, use technology (e.g. laptop, mobile devices) to keep in touch and play digital games with friends and family, or start enjoying a new hobby.

Visit with your friends and family outdoors, when possible. If this is not feasible, make sure the room or space is well-ventilated (for example, open windows or doors) and large enough to accommodate social distancing, staying 6 feet apart.

Arrange tables and chairs to allow for social distancing. People from the same household can be in groups together and don’t need to be 6 feet apart from each other.
Try to avoid close contact with your visitors. For example, don’t shake hands, elbow bump, or hug. Instead wave and verbally greet them.
If possible, avoid others who are not wearing masks or ask others around you to wear masks.
Consider keeping a list of people you visited or who visited you and when the visit occurred. This will help with contact tracing if someone becomes sick.
Learn about additional considerations for adults with developmental or behavioral disorders who might have difficulty with social distancing.

Practice hand hygiene often
Everyone should wash their hands or use hand sanitizer before preparing, serving or eating food.

Everyone should wash their hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds at the beginning and end of the visit and whenever you think your hands may have become contaminated.
If soap and water are not readily available, such as with outdoor visits or activities, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
Use single-use hand towels or paper towels for drying hands to avoid sharing towels. Have a no-touch trash can available for guests to use.
Limit contact with commonly touched surfaces or shared items.
When to delay or cancel a visit
Delay or cancel a visit if you or your visitors have symptoms of COVID-19 or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 in the last 14 days.
Anyone who has had close contact with a person with COVID-19 should stay home and monitor for symptoms.
Consider current levels of COVID-19 infection in your specific community. If infection is widespread, consider delaying or cancelling a visit.
Visiting Older Adults in Residential Communities
Residential communities for older adults may combine nursing, assisted, and independent living lifestyles. Each community may face different risks and decide to put in place less restrictive or more restrictive protocols.
If you have a family member or friend who lives in a nursing home, assisted living facility, or other type of senior living or retirement community, you may be concerned about COVID-19. To protect friends and family members who live in these communities, CDC has issued updated recommendations for visitations at post-acute facilities.  These recommendations align with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)external icon guidance for visitations under various circumstances.
Learn more about the risks among people who live in nursing homes or long-term care facilities and about CDC’s guidance for preventing the spread COVID-19 infection in nursing homes.

If You Are Sick or Think You Were Exposed to COVID-19
Contact Your Healthcare Provider and Seek Care

Check Your Symptoms
Symptoms of COVID-19 can range from mild symptoms to severe illness and death. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.
In some cases, older adults and people of any age with underlying medical conditions may have symptoms that are not typically seen in others, or they may take longer than others to develop fever and other symptoms.
Fever Temperatures Can be Lower in Older Adults
In older adults (aged 65 and older), normal body temperature can be lower than in younger adults. For this reason, fever temperatures can also be lower in older adults.
If you are an older adult experiencing fever or other symptoms and want to get tested for the virus that causes COVID-19, call your healthcare provider first. You can also visit your state or localexternal icon health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing. If you don’t have a healthcare provider, contact your nearest community health centerexternal icon or health department.
If you are caring for a patient aged 65 or older, be aware that a single reading higher than 100°F (37.8°C), multiple readings above 99°F (37.2°C), or a rise in temperature greater than 2°F (1.1°C) above the patient’s normal (baseline) temperature may be a sign of infection
Develop a Care Plan
A care plan summarizes your:
medical conditions,
medicines,
healthcare providers,
emergency contacts, and
end-of-life care options (for example, advance directives).
Complete your care plan in consultation with your doctor, and if needed, with help from a family member, caregiver or home health aide.
A care plan can have benefits beyond the current pandemic. You can update your care plan every year, or any time you have a change in your health or medicines. Care plans can help reduce emergency room visits and hospitalizations and improve overall medical management for people with a chronic medical condition, resulting in better quality of life.
During the COVID-19 pandemic, having a care plan is an important part of emergency preparedness.

Everyday Steps to Stay Healthy
Staying healthy during the pandemic is important. Talk to your healthcare provider about whether your vaccinations and other preventive services are up to date to help prevent you from becoming ill with other diseases.
It is particularly important for those at increased risk of severe illness, including older adults, to receive recommended vaccinations against influenza and pneumococcal disease.
Remember the importance of staying physically active and practicing healthy habits to cope with stress.
Talk with your healthcare provider about maintaining preventive services like cancer screenings during the pandemic.
If you have a medical emergency, do not delay seeking emergency care.
You may feel increased stress during this pandemic. Fear and anxiety can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions.  Learn about stress and coping.
Get tips on staying connected while at home in Englishpdf iconexternal icon and Spanishpdf iconexternal icon. There are community agencies who may be able to help, and call lines that provide a friendly voice and emotional support to older adults.
Getting Help at Home
Support is available if you need help with meals, household chores, home repairs, personal care, home health services, or transportation to your medical appointments and pharmacy. To connect with help in your community, visit the Eldercare Locatorexternal icon or call 1-800-677-1116.

VaccinationsThe U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of April 15, 2021, 198.3 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 125.8 million people, or 37.9% of the U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 78.5 million people, or 23.6% of the U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of April 15, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 3.3 million, a 10.3% increase from the previous week.The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of April 15, 80% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 63.7% are fully vaccinated. Nearly one half (48.3%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 30.3% are fully vaccinated.

COVID-19 Vaccination Trend Data DefinitionsDaily CountsDaily counts are not cumulative; one person should not receive two doses on the same day.Total Doses AdministeredCounts all doses administered on the given day.
People Receiving Dose 1*Represents the number of people who received their first dose of any vaccine on a given day. This represents the actual date a person received the vaccine.
People Who Are Fully Vaccinated*Represents the number of people who have received the second dose of a two-dose vaccine or one dose of a single-shot vaccine on a given day.
For reporting on CDC COVID Data Tracker, CDC counts people as being “fully vaccinated” if they received two doses on different days (regardless of time interval) of the two-dose mRNA series or received one dose of a single-dose vaccine.
This definition differs from the current CDC Interim Clinical Considerations in two ways:
According to the interim guidance, the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines should be administered as close to the recommended interval as possible, but not earlier than recommended (i.e., 3 weeks [Pfizer-BioNTech] or 1 month [Moderna]). However, second doses administered within a grace period of 4 days earlier than the recommended date for the second dose are still considered valid. If it is not feasible to adhere to the recommended interval and a delay in vaccination is unavoidable, the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines may be administered up to 6 weeks (42 days) after the first dose. Currently, only limited data are available on efficacy of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines administered beyond this window.
To ensure adequate time for an immune response to occur, a person is considered fully vaccinated greater than or equal to 2 weeks after completion of a two-dose mRNA series or single dose of Janssen vaccine.

Cumulative CountsSince December 14, 2020, represent the:
Total Doses AdministeredCounts all individual COVID-19 vaccine doses administered as reported to CDC by state, territorial, tribal, and local public health agencies and federal entities.
Total Number of People With at Least One Dose*Represents the total number of people who have received at least one dose of any vaccine type.
Total Number of People Who Are Fully Vaccinated*Represents the total number of people who have received the second dose of a two-dose vaccine or one dose of a single-shot vaccine.
Daily Change ReportedRepresents the daily total of new reports of administered doses by the date of CDC report. The daily change is displayed by the date that CDC first reported the totals on CDC COVID Data Tracker.
CDC has capped the percent of population coverage metrics at 99.9%. These metrics could be greater than 99.9% for multiple reasons, including census denominator data not including all individuals that currently reside in the jurisdiction (e.g., part time residents) or potential data reporting errors.
*The number of people receiving at least one dose and the number of people who are fully vaccinated were determined based on information reported to CDC by jurisdictions (states, territories, and local entities) and federal entities on dose number, vaccine manufacturer, administration date, recipient ID, and date of submission. Because the method used to determine dose numbers needs to be applied across multiple jurisdictions with different reporting practices, CDC’s dose number estimates might differ from those reported by jurisdictions and federal entities.

Links with this icon indicate that you are leaving the CDC website.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website.
Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.
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