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LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan’s governor has unveiled her plans to return students to the classroom this fall for the first time since schools were closed in March in favor of remote learning to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer told reporters Tuesday that the Safe Start plan requires districts to make […]

A military pilot has died in the crash of a fighter jet at during a training mission at Shaw Air Force Base in South Carolina

By

The Associated Press

July 1, 2020, 11:03 AM
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SUMTER, S.C. — A military pilot has died in the crash of a fighter jet during a training mission at Shaw Air Force Base in South Carolina.
20th Fighter Wing Commander Larry Sullivan confirmed the pilot’s death early Wednesday morning.

The crash happened on the military base around 11:30 p.m. Tuesday, news outlets reported.
Base officials said the pilot was performing a routine training mission in a F-16CM Fighting Falcon when the jet crashed. The pilot was the only person on board.
The cause of the crash is under investigation. The name of the pilot wasn’t immediately released.

China is demanding staff and business information from four U.S. media companies including The Associated Press in what it calls a necessary response to similar demands by Washington on Chinese state-controlled news outlets

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The Associated Press

July 1, 2020, 12:05 PM
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BEIJING — China has demanded staff and business information from four U.S. media companies including The Associated Press in what it called a necessary response to similar demands by Washington on Chinese state-controlled news outlets.
Foreign ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian announced Wednesday that the AP, United Press International, CBS and National Public Radio had seven days to file declarations regarding their staff, financial operations, real estate ownership and other matters.

“It should be pointed out that the above-mentioned measures by China are completely necessary countermeasures and are completely legitimate defenses compelled by unreasonable suppression of the U.S. side on Chinese media agencies in the United States,” Zhao said at a daily briefing.
The Trump administration last month added four Chinese media outlets to a list of organizations that should be considered “foreign missions” because of their ties to the government and the ruling Communist Party. That move could force them to cut staff in the U.S. and adds to a long list of frictions in economic and political relations between the two countries.
Zhao said recent U.S. policies damage the reputation and image of Chinese media, impact their operations and “seriously interfere with the normal people-to-people exchanges between China and the U.S.”
The Trump administration’s moves are rooted in “Cold War thinking” and go against the freedom of the press long espoused by Washington, he said.
“China urges the U.S. to immediately change its course and correct its mistakes and stop the political suppression and unreasonable restrictions of the Chinese media,” Zhao said.
State Department officials said at the time that the four organizations, including state-run CCTV, would be required to submit a list of everyone who works for them in the U.S. and any real estate holdings, the same as is required of foreign embassies or consulates.
None is being ordered to leave the U.S. and no limits on their activities were announced. But a visa cap was put on five other Chinese media organizations in March, forcing them to reduce their Chinese staff two weeks after they were designated as foreign missions.
Chinese media including the official Xinhua News Agency and the international arm of state broadcaster CCTV are now restricted to a total of 100 visas. Collectively, they employed about 160 Chinese in the U.S., meaning about 60 had to leave.
China retaliated by ordering more than a dozen reporters from The Washington Post, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal to hand in their press credentials, forcing them to leave the country because their visas were tied to their work status.

Four dozen wildfires are still burning in the West from Nebraska to California.

By

Max Golembo

July 1, 2020, 12:14 PM
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Hot weather continues to spread throughout the lower 48 states from Arizona to New York this morning.
Seven states from Kansas down to Louisiana are under a Heat Advisory where temperatures will be in the 90s for the most part, but with humidity it will feel like it’s close to 110 degrees in some areas.

Seven states from Kansas down to Louisiana are under a Heat Advisory where temperatures will be in the 90s for the most part, but with humidity it will feel like it’s close to 110 degrees in some areas.
Seven states from Kansas down to Louisiana are under a Heat Advisory where temperatures will be in the 90s for the most part, but with humidity it will feel like it’s close to 110 degrees in some areas.ABC News

The heat will spread as we head closer to the end of the week with 90 degree and higher temperatures expected from California to New York.
In the East, the big problem will be the high humidity so the 90s could feel more like 100 degrees.
For the Fourth of July on Saturday it looks like the Northeast part of the U.S. from Boston to New York City and Philadelphia could catch a break as a back door cold front could cool this area off.
Elsewhere, four dozen wildfires are still burning in the West from Nebraska to California.
The winds have slightly relaxed in some areas, however, allowing firefighters to make progress on some of the fires.
There are still four states from Nevada to Wyoming with Red Flag Warnings where winds could gust near 35 mph and relative humidity could drop as low as 5%.

There are still four states from Nevada to Wyoming with Red Flag Warnings where winds could gust near 35 mph and relative humidity could drop as low as 5%.
There are still four states from Nevada to Wyoming with Red Flag Warnings where winds could gust near 35 mph and relative humidity could drop as low as 5%.ABC News

In the East, it’s very much the opposite with wet conditions and localized areas of flash flooding.
Meanwhile, 4 to 6 inches of rain fell from the Dakotas down to Illinois and into Maine where flash flooding was reported.
Also, up to 2 inches of rain fell in parts of the Atlanta metro area in a short period of time and produced street flooding.
The result of this heavy rain is the slow moving storm pattern that keeps producing thunderstorms with heavy rain over the same areas.
Today, a Flash Flood Watch has been issued for Missouri, Illinois and Kentucky as this stationary frontal system stays put.
Over the next few days, the stationary front will continue to sit over the South and mid-Mississippi River Valley and will continue to produce localized heavy rain and some areas could see 2 to 4 inches of rain in a short period of time and that could cause flash flooding.

Over the next few days, the stationary front will continue to sit over the South and mid-Mississippi River Valley and will continue to produce localized heavy rain and some areas could see 2 to 4 inches of rain in a short period of time and that could cause flash flooding.
Over the next few days, the stationary front will continue to sit over the South and mid-Mississippi River Valley and will continue to produce localized heavy rain and some areas could see 2 to 4 inches of rain in a short period of time and that could cause flash flooding.ABC News

The victim suffered from severe head trauma with multiple injuries to his head.

By

Jon Haworth

July 1, 2020, 11:09 AM
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Two teenagers have been arrested and charged with first-degree murder in the beating death of a 63-year-old homeless man.
Police discovered 63-year-old Bobby J. Hill Jr. unresponsive in an alleyway and suffering from severe head trauma with multiple injuries to his head in Camden, New Jersey, shortly after receiving a call at around midnight on June 25, according to Acting Camden County Prosecutor Jill S. Mayer and Camden County Police Chief Joseph Wysocki.

Hill was subsequently transported to an area hospital where he succumbed to his injuries and pronounced dead.
Less than a week later, however, authorities have announced that a 15-year-old male and 17-year-old female have been charged with first-degree murder in the homicide of the homeless man.

“Through the investigation, surveillance footage was discovered showing the teenagers entering the alleyway with Hill shortly before the crime happened. Several minutes later, they were filmed leaving the area without Hill,” said Mayer and Wysocki in a statement.
According to the Camden County Prosecutor and the Camden County Police Chief, detectives were also able to retrieve video footage from one of the suspect’s cell phones of Hill’s body in the alleyway in the aftermath of the assault.

Due to the ages of the two suspects involved in the case, their identities have not been made public.
The investigation is ongoing and no court dates have been announced.

Volvo Cars says it is recalling nearly 2.1 million vehicles worldwide as a preventive measure after the company discovered that a steel wire connected to the front seat belts can be weakened

By

The Associated Press

July 1, 2020, 9:34 AM
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COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Volvo Cars said Wednesday that it is recalling nearly 2.1 million vehicles worldwide as a preventive measure after the company discovered that a steel wire connected to the front seat belts can be weakened.
The front seat belts are anchored to the car via this steel cable, press spokesman Stefan Elfstrom told Swedish public radio. “We have seen that this wire can be subject to wear and tear under special conditions,” reducing the seat belt’s protection, he said, adding “this is a very rare problem.”

Volvo said the recall, which is the biggest ever for the brand, “is a preventive safety recall to avoid future issues.”
The Swedish carmaker said the affected models are Volvo S60, S60L, S60CC, V60, V60CC, XC60, V70, XC70, S80 och S80L manufactured between 2006 and 2019. No current models are included in the recall.
There have been no reports of injuries or accidents linked to the fault. Volvo Cars has been owned by China’s Zhejiang Geely Holding Group since 2010.

Official figures show that Germany’s unemployment rate ticked higher in June

By

The Associated Press

July 1, 2020, 8:34 AM
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BERLIN — Germany’s unemployment rate ticked higher in June, official figures showed Wednesday, but the rise was slower than in the previous two months and extensive use of a government-backed short-time work program kept job losses down.
The unadjusted jobless rate, the headline rate in Germany, rose to 6.2% from 6.1% in May. It is up more than a percentage point since March, when it stood at 5.1%. The Federal Labor Agency said that 2.85 million people were registered as unemployed — 40,000 more than in May and 637,000 more than a year earlier.

In seasonally adjusted terms, unemployment was up to 6.4% from 6.3% in May. That rate stood at 5% in March.
Rises in unemployment in Germany and elsewhere in Europe have been moderate by international standards because employers are making heavy use of short-time work programs that allows them to keep employees on the payroll while they await better times.
In Germany, Europe’s largest economy, the labor agency pays at least 60% of the salary of employees who are on reduced or zero hours.
The agency said Wednesday that it paid out for 6.83 million people in April, the most recent month for which it has figures. That compares with 2.49 million in March, the month when the pandemic hit Germany, and just 133,000 in February. Germany has 83 million inhabitants.
Germany started easing coronavirus restrictions in late April and the process has gathered pace since, but many restrictions still remain.

U.S. travelers remain barred due to soaring coronavirus infections.

By

Morgan Winsor

July 1, 2020, 9:34 AM
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A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 511,000 people worldwide.
Over 10.4 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 2.6 million diagnosed cases and at least 127,425 deaths.
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Here’s how the news is developing today. All times Eastern. Please refresh this page for updates
3:38 a.m.: Europe reopens borders but US travelers remain barred
The European Union began opening its external borders on Wednesday, but travelers from the United States aren’t among those allowed to visit.
EU ambassadors have agreed on lifting travel restrictions for 15 countries based on the epidemiological situation and containment measures, including Australia, Canada, South Korea and Tunisia. China was also included on the list but with a caveat — the country must reciprocate by allowing EU travelers to visit.

A waiter carries beers for customers sitting at a terrace bar in Tarragona, Spain, on May 11, 2020. The European Union announced on June 30 that it will reopen its borders to travelers from more than a dozen countries but not the United States, where coronavirus infections are soaring.
A waiter carries beers for customers sitting at a terrace bar in Tarragona, Spain, on May 11, 2020. The European Union announced on June 30 that it will reopen its borders to travelers from more than a dozen countries but not the United States, where coronavirus infections are soaring.Emilio Morenatti/AP

Countries where coronavirus infections are on the rise were excluded from the list, noticeably the United States, Russia and Brazil.
The criteria requires that the number of new COVID-19 cases over the last 14 days per 100,000 people is similar or below that of the EU’s. According to The New York Times, the average among the 27 countries within the EU was 16 in mid-June; in the United States, it was 107.

A woman walks her dog on a bridge with the Eiffel tower in the background in Paris, France, on April 7, 2020, during a nationwide confinement to counter the novel coronavirus. The European Union announced on June 30 that it will reopen its borders to travelers from more than a dozen countries but not the United States, where coronavirus infections are soaring.
A woman walks her dog on a bridge with the Eiffel tower in the background in Paris, France, on April 7, 2020, during a nationwide confinement to counter the novel coronavirus. The European Union announced on June 30 that it will reopen its borders to travelers from more than a dozen countries but not the United States, where coronavirus infections are soaring.Christophe Ena/AP

The EU said countries must also have a “stable or decreasing trend of new cases over this period in comparison to the previous 14 days.” The bloc will consider the reliability of each nation’s data as well as what measures have been taken in response to their outbreaks, including contact tracing and testing. Reciprocity will also be taken into account.
U.S. President Donald Trump suspended travelers from most European countries in March.
What to know about coronavirus:

How it started and how to protect yourself: Coronavirus explained
What to do if you have symptoms: Coronavirus symptoms
Tracking the spread in the U.S. and worldwide: Coronavirus map

Miraculously, the suspect suffered no injuries in the crash.

By

Jon Haworth

July 1, 2020, 8:55 AM
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A man has been arrested – and is lucky to be alive – after leading police on a chase at speeds of more than 100 mph that ended up with him driving off a cliff and into the Pacific Ocean.
The incident occurred at approximately 3:30 p.m. on June 30 near Santa Cruz, California, when authorities were responding to reports of a man shooting a handgun in the air near Davenport, California, according to the Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office.

Authorities say that not long after the initial incident, the same individual was suspected of carjacking a vehicle in the area and proceeded to flee the scene but when deputies located the vehicle and attempted to stop the car, the suspect fled.
“The suspect continued driving South towards the city of Santa Cruz reaching over 100 miles per hour, refusing to pull over,” said the Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office in a statement on social media. “The suspect continued into the city of Santa Cruz down Mission Street where deputies terminated the pursuit for the safety of the community.”

A police chase began at approximately 3:30 p.m. on June 30 near Santa Cruz, California, when authorities were responding to reports of a man shooting a handgun in the air near Davenport, California, according to the Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office.
A police chase began at approximately 3:30 p.m. on June 30 near Santa Cruz, California, when authorities were responding to reports of a man shooting a handgun in the air near Davenport, California, according to the Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Office.Santa Cruz Police Department

The Santa Cruz Police Department located the vehicle shortly after when the suspect was involved in a solo vehicle traffic collision and ended up flying off of a cliff and into the Pacific Ocean.
Authorities say that the suspect was able to climb out of the vehicle and wade onto shore and up the rocky shoreline where deputies were able to take the suspect, who miraculously suffered no injuries in the accident, into custody without further incident.

Said the Santa Cruz Police Department in their own statement: “Thank you to all the involved Santa Cruz County agencies for helping out and keeping the community safe, and especially the SCFD & county wide rescue swimmers for deploying on a moment’s notice.”
The unnamed suspect is now awaiting charges in the incident as the investigation continues.